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I am trying to read a bibtex file into my JavaScript script. The Regex used to parse the file is:

/(.*)\s*=\s*[{"'](.*|.*\s+.*|.*\s+.*\s+.*|.*\s+.*\s+.*\s+.*|.*\s+.*\s+.*\s+.*\s+.*)[}"'],?/g

This works as I want it to:

@Article{journals/aim/Sloman99,
  title =   "Review of Affective Computing",
  author =  "Aaron Sloman",
  journal = "AI Magazine",
  year =    "1999",
  number =  "1",
  volume =  "20",
  url = "http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/aim/aim20.html#Sloman99",
  pages =   "127--133",
}

It gives me nice key.value pairs like: "author : Aaron Sloman".

This doesn't:

@Article{journals/aim/Sloman99,
  title =   "Review of Affective Computing",
  author =  "Aaron
  S
  l
  o
  m
  a
  n",
  journal = "AI Magazine",
  year =    "1999",
  number =  "1",
  volume =  "20",
  url = "http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/aim/aim20.html#Sloman99",
  pages =   "127--133",
}

It just omits the author.

So how can I make a regex that matches an entry with as much newlines (not only as much as there are repetitions of ".*\s+") as there are till it encounters a " or a }?

share|improve this question
    
you'll need a BIGGER sub-expression than .*\s+.*\s+.*\s+.*\s+.* to match all the whitespace that the newline incurs. –  treecoder Aug 24 '11 at 13:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I know people love to use regular expressions to parse markup, it seems to be a fad... like lady gaga, or the Fun Dip. But if you want to parse mark up efficentially you should use a parser or write one.

Why, Regular expressions is meant to parse regular language. Most markdowns cannot be expressed as an NFA or DFA. And because of this using regex to parse them is... impossible at the hardest point, and just slow at the easiest.

There are a couple great JS bibtex parsers out there

are two, I recommend you look at those... I know you have already done work to create your regular expression but I promise your job will become much easier when you take the step to a real parser.

Just a small example of why your regex is bad and a parser is better.

Matching patterns include

;;;)(>$#@ = 'dfsa3 342 '}
((())))+++>$#@ = 'dfsa3@@//''''''''''''
>$#@ = 'dfsa3@@//'''}}}}"""

These are not good!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply Austin, but the problem about the two libraries you suggest is that I am not sure if I am legally allowed to use them, because the software I am writing isn't free software. Also the regex is not my whole program but just the part used to read the tags. In fact I am trying to write a parser but I am not used to programming in JavaScript, and regex where to first thing that I found to do the job. So any suggestions on how to correct the regex or another simple solution on how to do that are very welcome. –  Daniel Aug 24 '11 at 13:50
    
It tried to use bibtex-js now, but I doesn't work with my input files, because it's comment handling is broken, and I am having troubles fixing it. Also I am still not 100% sure if the MIT License allows me to use it. I am writing an in-house tool to upload publication lists via Greasemonkey so the code will never be published. –  Daniel Aug 24 '11 at 14:58
    
After a small changes Bibtex-js works as I want it too. And I am pretty sure now that what I am doing complies to the MIT License. Thank you. –  Daniel Aug 25 '11 at 10:42
    
MIT License in a nutshell says use it for everything and anything you want without permission. You are safe –  austinbv Aug 25 '11 at 11:28

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