Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to cast a object during an if - else statement as follows:

if(sourceSystem.equalsIgnoreCase("Src")) {
  MO object = (MO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
} else {  
  UO object = (URO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);  
}

However it cannot be accessed outside of these?

validator.validate(object);

cannot be resolved to a variable. But surely the object is being created an assigned within the if-else statement. The object will always be created, therefore why is the compiler telling me it cannot be resolved to a variable. Yes I get local and global vairables however if I need to access a common method between UO and MO.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't achieve what you want this way. Better try this:

Object object = transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
if( object instanceof MO )
{
  //cast and use it as MO
}//if
else
{
  //cast and use it as UO
}//else

Inheritance could help you to group code of both blocks if UO and MO share the methods you use in each block.

share|improve this answer
1  
How can I check that this is an instanceof MO? I am not aware how to do this in Java nor does the Object class contain the method for this. –  Will Aug 24 '11 at 14:05
1  
instanceof is a java keyword and does exactly that. Just try it! –  f1sh Aug 24 '11 at 14:12
add comment

You are actually declaring two variables named object. Each of them has a very limited scope, namely the block they are found in.

Assuming for a second that you could access the variables after the if statement completes: what would the type of object be in that case?

You need to declare a variable before the if and assign to that in both cases. You'll need to decide on a single type for this, however. In the worst case you need to use Object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this:

MO MOObject = null;
UO UOObject = null;
if(sourceSystem.equalsIgnoreCase("Src"))
{
    MOObject = (MO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
}
else
{
    UOObject = (URO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
}

Then in follow-up code can be based on which one of these was not null.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The variable object are only known within the blocks. If you want to use object in validator, then do it like this:

Object object = null;
if(sourceSystem.equalsIgnoreCase("Src")) {
  object = transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
} else {  
  object = transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);  
}
validator.validate(object);

or even much shorter

validator.validate(transformer.create(message, sourceSystem, flowName));

Note that casting is not required (as long as create returns the type that is used by validate)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Declare it outside the if blocks.

YourParentType object;
if(sourceSystem.equalsIgnoreCase("Src"))
    {
    object = (MO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
    }
    else{
    object = (URO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
    }
  • MO and URO are related objects, you you may want to have a common parent for these. This class is what I mean by YourParentType
  • What you are trying to do is similar to the Factory Design Pattern. You will find that this kind of ifs repeat in may places in your code. You can move them to a "Factory" class. (Or use the transformer as a factory by moving the if into it, depending on what it does.)
share|improve this answer
add comment

The most elegant way of doing this would be to declare an interface, (say MessageInterface) and have both your MO and URO objects implement it.

Then you'll have to do something like this:

MessageInterface messageObject;
if(sourceSystem.equalsIgnoreCase("Src")) {
    messageObject = (MO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
} else {
    messageObject = (URO) transformer.create(message,sourceSystem,flowName);
}
validator.validate(object);

If you don't have direct access to declaration of MO and URO you can still do this by creating a wrapper for them that implements the above interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.