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I'm working on an android project that have to maintain global state across activities. For this I'm extending Application successfully. However a new requirement for the project is to maintain state even if the application is killed by android OS, and for this simply extending Application will not be enough since the object will be killed along with the app.

To solve this I have implemented Serializable to the object that extends Application:

    public class AppState extends Application implements Serializable

and then I write the object to private storage when the main activity is destroyed:

    @Override
public void onDestroy() {
    super.onDestroy();
    ByteArrayOutputStream bos = null;
    ObjectOutputStream oos = null;
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    // If there's a certificate creation in progress, let's store it more
    // permanently before killing the app.
    if (appState.getCertificate() != null) {
        try {
            bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            oos = new ObjectOutputStream(bos);
            oos.writeObject(appState);
            byte[] buf = bos.toByteArray();

            fos = openFileOutput(Constants.objectStoreFileName, Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
            fos.write(buf);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            if (bos != null) {
                try {
                    bos.close();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            if (oos != null) {
                try {
                    oos.close();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            if (fos != null) {
                try {
                    fos.close();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Then I restore the object by calling:

    private void getAppStateFromFile() {
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    ObjectInputStream ois = null;
    ByteArrayOutputStream bos = null;
    try {
        fis = openFileInput(Constants.objectStoreFileName);
        bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        byte[] b = new byte[1024];
        int bytesRead = 0;
        while ((bytesRead = fis.read(b)) != -1) {
           bos.write(b, 0, bytesRead);
        }
        byte[] bytes = bos.toByteArray();
        ois = new ObjectInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(bytes));
        AppState appStateFromFile = (AppState) ois.readObject();
        if (appStateFromFile != null) {
            // restore values from appStateFromFile
        }
    } catch (StreamCorruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (OptionalDataException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        deleteFile(Constants.objectStoreFileName);
        if (fis != null) {
            try {
                fis.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        if (ois != null) {
            try {
                ois.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        if (bos != null) {
            try {
                bos.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

It's working fine, but I got curious to how many have used this approach. I thought it would be quite common since I have read a lot about people wanting to save state more permanently. But to my surprice googling on "'extends Application implements Serializable' android" returned 0 results. Is this not a recommended approach for some reason? Otherwise it could serve as a solution to others facing the same problem.

share|improve this question
1  
lol do not implement serializable on Application. Instead make a Singleton object that has all of the variables you want within it. You can then make this serializable and use that. –  Blundell Aug 24 '11 at 14:00
    
I was mostly curious to see if it would work at all, and since I was already using Application it was easy just to test it. But what could the consequences be? –  user909722 Aug 24 '11 at 14:16
    
That it won't work.... –  Blundell Aug 24 '11 at 14:27
    
Well it does work. That's why I'm asking if this is bad practice for some reason. –  user909722 Aug 24 '11 at 14:37
    
Your not showing what variables your storing, but I assume your putting transient on the context etc, so this means you may as well have a separate class that stores your state. It's bad practice in that it is code bloat/unneccessary coupling/ doesn't help if refactoring is needed / impossible to debug if it comes to it / plain ugly! –  Blundell Aug 24 '11 at 14:40

1 Answer 1

SharedPreferences enables you to save state in the way that you want, so the global variables are updated in SharedPreferences when changes are made in the Application object. Using Application for global state is good, though I'm not sure relying on onDestroy to be called in the Application is the best to go. When onCreate is called again in the Application you can re-initiate the state.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh it's the activities ondestroy that calls the save. In this case the Application object is not necessarily destroyed I don't think, so you could be saving the application state for no reason. I'm not sure of that so I might go check myself, could explain why others don't save state this way. –  Manno23 Aug 24 '11 at 14:30
    
That is a pretty good idea, but it will not quite work in my case. The object that I store to file contains several ArrayLists, and converting these to SharedPreferences and back would be too much work. –  user909722 Aug 24 '11 at 14:34
    
Yes it's the main activity that calls onDestroy(). Perhaps I could call isFinishing() to identify if the activity is finishing normally or being killed. –  user909722 Aug 24 '11 at 14:40

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