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I have a page where I am using jquery/ajax to pull down a chunk of HTML/JS from another component and injecting it into the page. That HTML references additional JS files, and I need those referenced JS files to be loaded before I run my javascript.

The HTML/JS that is being injected looks something like this:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://myserver/js/ABunchOfStuff.js"></script>
<div>
   blah blah blah
</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    //"sourceList" is defined in the ABunchOfStuff.js above, but it's not available by the time this executes.  
    $("input#autocomplete").autocomplete({
        source: sourceList,
        minLength: 2
    });
</script>

Normally I would just hook into a window load event or a $(document).ready() or whatever, but in this case the window and document have already been completely loaded, and now we're adding additional content after the fact.

One possiblity would be to put a recursive setTimeout call in that would keep firing until the referneced javascript was available, but that's pretty ugly.

So is there any clean way to trap the event of a referenced javascript has been loaded and to execute code at that time?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure? The way you have it, until ABunchOfStuff.js is downloaded and available, even div is not going to be rendered. –  Mrchief Aug 24 '11 at 15:02
    
Have you tried putting the code within $(function() { });? So that it only executes when the DOM is ready? api.jquery.com/ready –  Tim B James Aug 24 '11 at 15:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can also use getScript and do your autoComplete in the success callback:

jQuery.getScript( 'http://myserver/js/ABunchOfStuff.js', function(data, textStatus) {
        $("input#autocomplete").autocomplete({
            source: sourceList,
            minLength: 2
        });
} );
share|improve this answer
    
Exellent, thank you! –  Mike Mooney Aug 24 '11 at 16:03

The big question is, how do you inject this script ?

If you using "standard" script tag insertion, you can go and watch for the onload event (onreadystatechange in IE).

var scr = document.createElement('script');
    scr.type = 'text/javascript';
    scr.src = 'somewhere/somename.js';
    scr.onload = scr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if( /complete|loaded/.test(scr.readyState) ) {
            // do something
        }
        else {
            // do something
        }
    };
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using Jquery to execute a $.post call to retrieve the content, and then a the .html() method to put the HTML and JS into a container div –  Mike Mooney Aug 24 '11 at 15:09

What you are doing wrong here is not waiting for the DOM to load.

If you change your .autocomplete to only execute once the DOM is loaded through $(document).ready it will have executed the ABunchOfStuff.js

Like this:

(function($) {
  $(document).ready(function() {
    $("input#autocomplete").autocomplete({
        source: sourceList,
        minLength: 2
    });
  }
}(jQuery));
share|improve this answer
    
In my case the DOM is already loaded. This content is being added to the page well after the page has been loaded, so the document.ready event is long gone by then. –  Mike Mooney Aug 24 '11 at 16:02
    
Then why isn't your external javascript not executed? Once the dom is ready the JavaScript has been executed.. –  Tigraine Aug 24 '11 at 20:10

If you control the http://myserver/js/ABunchOfStuff.js file, then you can call your other JS from it when it first executes. Since it executes when it first loads and when it's available, you have the perfect timing.

If this JS file is used other places too, you could add some generic functionality to it for calling a callback when it executes by adding something like this to it:

try {
    if (aBunchOfStuffCallbacks) {
        for (var i = 0; i < aBunchOfStuffCallbacks.length; i++) {
            aBunchOfStuffCallbacks[i].call(this);    // call callback to announce we're loaded
        }
    } catch(e) {}

And, then in any web page where you want to be called when aBunchOfStuffCallbacks was loaded, you would just do this:

var aBunchOfStuffCallbacks = [];
aBunchOfStuffCallbacks.push(myFunc);
function myFunc() {
     // put my code here for when aBunchOfStuffCallbacks is loaded
}

This would allow for multiple callbacks. The simpler version for just one callback looks like this:

try {
    if (aBunchOfStuffCallback) {
            aBunchOfStuffCallback.call(this);    // call callback to announce we're loaded
        }
    } catch(e) {}

And, it would look like this to set it:

var aBunchOfStuffCallbacks = function () {
     // put my code here for when aBunchOfStuffCallbacks is loaded
}
share|improve this answer
    
I control it, but it is an include file that contains some common functionality used by several different pages. I don't want to burn any page-specific logic into a generic include file –  Mike Mooney Aug 24 '11 at 16:03
    
You could have it look for a global callback variable and call the callback in that global variable only if it was present. Then you'd be adding more generic capabilities to the included JS file that you could use when needed and would do nothing when not needed. See what I added to my answer for details. –  jfriend00 Aug 24 '11 at 16:13

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