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How can I delete all the textures I've made? Suppose I load a few textures:

GLuint tx_wall,tx_floor,tx_tiles;
tx_wall=LoadTexture("tex_wall.raw",512,512),
tx_floor=LoadTexture("tex_floor.raw",512,512),
tx_tiles=LoadTexture("tex_tiles.raw",512,512);

then use them:

glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,tx_wall);
  glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 0); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 0); glVertex3f(0,  50,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 1); glVertex3f(0,   0, 14);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 1); glVertex3f(0,  50, 14);
  glEnd();
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,tx_floor);
  glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 0); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 0); glVertex3f(50,  50, 0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 1); glVertex3f(50,  50, 0);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 1); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
  glEnd();
(and so on)

and when the game ends, delete them:

glDeleteTextures(1,&tx_wall);
glDeleteTextures(1,&tx_floor);
glDeleteTextures(1,&tx_tiles);

All works fine but if i have 10 or 20 textures than how will i terminate them all without taking their names?

share|improve this question
2  
Answer given already (put all the to-be-deleted texture names into an array, pass that array and its length to glDeleteTextures). However you're not required to delete your stuff when your application ends. OpenGL uses an abstract object model anyway, so this is not some kind of memory leak if you terminate the process without cleaning up. Deleting a texture name merely detaches the texture name from whatever data it may have carried (and the driver's garbage collector will clean it up, sometime, maybe immediately) – datenwolf Aug 24 '11 at 15:17

If you put all texture identifiers in an array, you can delete them all in one call using glDeleteTextures (just like you can generate them all in one call using glGenTextures).

GLuint textures[3];
glGenTextures(3, textures);

/* ... */

glDeleteTextures(3, textures);
share|improve this answer
    
ok thanks for that but anyway to delete that with there names? – CppOgl Aug 24 '11 at 15:18
1  
@CppOgl : I thought you asked to be able to do it without their names ? – Sander De Dycker Aug 24 '11 at 15:20
    
well i asked that if i could delete them all without putting in an array. – CppOgl Aug 24 '11 at 15:31
2  
@CppOgl : I didn't (and don't) see that in your original question, but maybe the approach explained by Adam Bowen fits your needs better then ? While I was trying to provide a direct answer to your question, his approach is the recommended way of dealing with (texture) resource management. – Sander De Dycker Aug 24 '11 at 15:37

Perhaps not exactly what you were intending, but RAII would be a sensible option:

class Texture
{
public:
    Texture( const std::string& name, int width, int height ) :
        m_id( LoadTexture(name.c_str(),width,height) )
    {
    }

    ~Texture()
    {
        if(m_id)
            glDeleteTextures(1,&m_id);
        m_id = 0;
    }

    GLuint id() const
    {
        return m_id;
    }

private:
    Texture( const Texture& );
    Texture& operator=( const Texture& );

    GLuint m_id;
};

Usage:

Texture tx_wall("tex_wall.raw",512,512);
Texture tx_floor("tex_floor.raw",512,512);
Texture tx_tiles("tex_tiles.raw",512,512);

and:

glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,tx_wall.id());
  glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 0); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 0); glVertex3f(0,  50,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 1); glVertex3f(0,   0, 14);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 1); glVertex3f(0,  50, 14);
  glEnd();
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,tx_floor.id());
  glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 0); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 0); glVertex3f(50,  50, 0);
    glTexCoord2f(1, 1); glVertex3f(50,  50, 0);
    glTexCoord2f(0, 1); glVertex3f(0,   0,  0);
  glEnd();

The benefit is that you can retain textures only for as long as you need them, the code is exception safe and texture release is automatic. The downside is that you can't copy Texture objects around without some kind of reference counting (for which I would recommend using boost::shared_ptr rather than rolling your own, because reference counting in multi-threaded environments is tricky). The latter is the reason for the private copy constructor and assignment operator.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. The question is tagged C++ after all, and not C - so scoping is the way to go! – ltjax Aug 24 '11 at 15:19
4  
Be warned! If you use a RAII object to control the lifetime of OpenGL objects, remember that OpenGL functions cannot be called before an OpenGL context is initialized and made current, or after it has been destroyed or made non-current. So this object cannot be global, file-static, or any other sort of thing. – Nicol Bolas Aug 24 '11 at 20:06
    
@Nicol Bolas Good point. – Adam Bowen Aug 25 '11 at 7:43

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