Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on an application using Entity Framework 4.1 with DbContext API, in a disconnected environment. I have two basic entities, Person and Degree. Degree has a non-mandatory one-to-many relationship to Person.

The issue is occurring when I update the DegreeId property on the Person entity to a different value. When I save the changes, EF generates an Update statement on the actual Degree table. This in turn causes a concurrency error violation when two or more users are using the application. I was able to find the issue while using SQL Profiler. I’ve tried several configuration variations using the Fluent API, but nothing seems to suppress the additional Update statement on the Degree table.

Here are my entities:

public partial class Person
    {
        public int PersonId { get; set; }
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string MiddleName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public Nullable<int> DegreeId { get; set; }

        public Degree Degree { get; set; }
    }

public partial class Degree 
    {
        public int DegreeId { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

In my Repository class, I am loading the Person object graph as such:

public override Person GetById(int id)
   {
         return DataContext.People
                    .Include(d => d.Degree)
                    .FirstOrDefault(x => x.PersonId == id);
   }

In my Service layer, I am getting a person record, and then updating the DegreeId property to a specific value. Note: UnitOfWork.Commit method exposes SaveChanges on DbContext.

using (var unitOfWork = IoC.Resolve<IUnitOfWork>())
  {
        var personRepository = new PersonRepository(unitOfWork);
        var person = personRepository.GetById(240);
        person.DegreeId = 1;
        personRepository.Update(person);
        unitOfWork.Commit();
  }

My repository update method attaches the person entity and marks the entity state as modified:

var state = DataContext.Entry(entity).State;
dbSet.Attach(entity);
DataContext.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified; 

Here is the SQL statement found in the Profiler session:

exec sp_executesql N'declare @p int
update [Client].[Degree]
set @p = 0
where (([DegreeId] = @0) and ([RowVersion] = @1))
select [RowVersion]
from [Client].[Degree]
where @@ROWCOUNT > 0 and [DegreeId] = @0',N'@0 int,
@1 binary(8)',@0=1,@1=0x0000000000004469

Does anyone know how to stop EF from sending this update statement to SQL Server? Is there something apparent in my entity configuration that causes EF to assume the Degree is also affected?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have RowVersion properties (with TimeStamp attribute?) which you don't show here on your Person and Degree classes? Also: You don't need to Include the Degree property when you load the Person and you don't need to call personRepository.Update(person) at all because EF change detection will figure out that person.DegreeId has been modified when you commit. But I don't think that this is really the source of your problem. –  Slauma Aug 24 '11 at 17:53
    
@Slauma-yes, I have a base class, which includes a RowVersion and is set in the model configuration. If I do not use the Include when I load the Person, the Degree navigation property is not ready to use in my UI Layer... eg. Person.Degree.Name. The consumer of the entities will be an ASP.Net web application. It will retrieve a Person from the Service Layer, modify properties and send back to Service Layer. I ommitted the Service Layer in hope of maintaining clarity. –  connr Aug 24 '11 at 18:11
    
OK, I thought the using block you are showing was just a service method to retrieve the person, set the DegreeId and save the change. Apparently you are doing more with the loaded person then. Anyway, I was trying to find such an update statement on the Degree with SQL profiler but can't find one. For me it behaves as expected: just an update statement for Person which sets the DegreeId and nothing more. It might be necessary that you show more context and code, the update statement you found is not "normal" in my opinion in the simple situation you described. –  Slauma Aug 24 '11 at 18:21
    
@Slauma-The service method takes a Person object as a parameter. I assume that the UI will modify the properties and then send to the service layer. The Degree update statement in question is only generated when I use the Include statement to load the Person entity. If I omit that, then the update works as expected. However, I then have to require that the UI request a Degree instance each time I display it, rather than loading it with the Person request. –  connr Aug 24 '11 at 19:51
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was able to find the cause of this issue and prevent it from occurring, but I cannot really explain why it was occurring.

My tables include a TimeStamp column and a corresponding property in the base class for my entities. I did not show the base class in my original question because it only includes the RowVersion and other audit properties, which I assumed were irrelevant. One would think I would've learned by know not assume anything about Entity Framework.

Here is my base class definition for the Degree entity:

public abstract class EntityBase : ValidableObject, IEntityBase
{
    public virtual byte[] RowVersion { get; protected set; }
    public virtual DateTime? CreateDate { get; set; }
    public virtual string CreateUser { get; set; }
    public virtual DateTime? ModifyDate { get; set; }
    public virtual string ModifyUser { get; set; }
}

Here is my context model configuration for the Degree entity:

internal class DegreeConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Degree>
    {
        internal DegreeConfiguration()
            : base()
        {
            ToTable("Degree", "dbo");
            Property(x => x.RowVersion).IsRowVersion();
        }
    }

Because of my application requirements, I must load the Person entity using the Include method to eagerly load the Degree entity so the object graph is fully populated when the consumer requests the entity.

return ctx.People.Include(p => p.Degree).Where(x => x.PersonId == id).First();

When the DegreeId property of the Person object is modified and attached to the Context, the following Update statement is generated upon calling SaveChanges():

exec sp_executesql N'declare @p int
update [dbo].[Degree]
set @p = 0
where (([DegreeId] = @0) and ([RowVersion] = @1))
select [RowVersion]
from [dbo].[Degree]
where @@ROWCOUNT > 0 and [DegreeId] = @0',N'@0 int,
@1 binary(8)',@0=2,@1=0x00000000000007DF

This is occurring even though I am not knowingly updating the Degree entity and causes havoc when two or more users using the application simultaneously.

To suppress the Update statement from being generated on the Degree navigation property, I commented out the concurrency check on the model configuration as such:

internal class DegreeConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Degree>
    {
        internal DegreeConfiguration()
            : base()
        {
            ToTable("Degree", "dbo");
            //Property(x => x.RowVersion).IsRowVersion();
        }
    }

Upon re-executing the process, EF no longer generates the problematic Update statement.

I've done a considerable number of searches both on MS site for EF 4.1, as well as general Google searches. I cannot come up with any concrete explanations.

Thank you.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't .IsRowVersion() in Fluent API the counterpart to the [TimeStamp] attribute in data annotations? I remember that I tested with a RowVersion property with [TimeStamp] attribute when I looked into your question. But the weird UPDATE statement didn't occur in my example. Anyway, thanks for posting your findings! –  Slauma Aug 25 '11 at 20:32
    
Here (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) it is said that "Setting the property to be a row version will automatically configure it to be an optimistic concurrency token." Perhaps it is possible to keep the rowversion but disable the concurrency check explicitely: Property(x => x.RowVersion).IsRowVersion().IsConcurrencyToken(false). No idea if this will work... –  Slauma Aug 25 '11 at 20:45
1  
Yeah, that works. It will at least allow me to keep the RowVersion in my base class and not cause concurrency issues. That seems like a much better work-around than simply applying the Ignore method on the property in the model configuration. Thanks for looking into it. –  connr Aug 26 '11 at 14:08
    
Cool, good to know this trick! –  Slauma Aug 26 '11 at 14:10
    
But doesn't this break optimistic concurrency handling on degree? I get that it solves the problem regarding modifications to Person, but haven't you lost something valuable? –  pamphlet Aug 22 '12 at 14:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.