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I have strings stored in various objects, for example a, b, c[2:7] (ie 5 different strings c[2],...c[6]), d.s, e.s[:] (ie all strings stored in the e.s list). I need to loop over all these strings on various places in the code and modify these variables in the loops. (Assigning the modified strings to new variables would not work as there are other functions expecting the modified strings in the original variables.) How can I do that efficiently in Python?

If I could create a list of references to the strings then I could just always iterate over it:

str_ref_lst=[reference(a), reference(b), reference(d.s)]
str_ref_lst.extend[reference(c[2:7])]
str_ref_lst.extend[reference(e.s[:])]
...
for ref_strng in str_ref_lst:
  do_string_modifications1(dereference(ref_strng))
...
function_using_the_modified_variables1()
...
for ref_strng in str_ref_lst:
  do_string_modifications2(dereference(ref_strng))
...
function_using_the_modified_variables2()
etc

However, I am not aware of reference()/dereference() analogues in Python (and I guess it would not be the right way in Python anyway)

share|improve this question
    
fwiw, this gives out a weird code smell. Can you say a bit more about why you need to change these variables all over the code? Would it be possible to refactor things so that you get notifications when they change and have them all register in one place for updating? –  Assaf Lavie Aug 24 '11 at 17:33
    
The variables are actually not all over the code, they are just different attributes of two related classes (but I wanted to make the example general and simpler). Some refactoring would be possible but too complicated, I think... –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 17:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The recommended answer should be "use a dictionary", but if you have to do it that way:

class cls(object):
    pass

a = "<a>"
b = "<b>"
c = ["", "", "<c>"]
d = cls()
d.s = "<d.s>"
e = cls()
e.s = "<e.s>"

var_list = "a b c[2:7] d.s e.s".split()

for var in var_list:
    exec "%s+='Mod'" % var             # Modify the variables

print a,b,c,d.s,e.s
# >>> <a>Mod <b>Mod ['', '', '<c>', 'M', 'o', 'd'] <d.s>Mod <e.s>Mod

IIRC this way doesn't work in Python 3.0 because of internal optimizations

With slices, it should be somewhat like

import re

class cls(object):
    pass

def fn(var):      # function to apply to the strings
    return "[%s mod]" % var

a = "<a>"
b = "<b>"
c = "01234567890"
d = cls()
d.s = "<d.s>"
e = cls()
e.s = "<e.s>"

var_list = "a b c[2:7] d.s e.s".split()

for var in var_list:
    # Modify the variables
    try:
        # exec "%s='Hi there'" % var             # Modify the variables
        exec "%(var)s=fn(%(var)s)" % { "var": var }
    except TypeError:
        # Assume Slice...
        slice_ = re.findall("\[(\d+)\:(\d+)\]", var)[0]   # Get slice
        var_with_slice = var
        var = var.split("[")[0]                 # Remove slice
        # Look ma, I can code in Perl too! :)
        line = \
             "%(var)s=%(var)s[:%(slice1)s]+fn(%(var_with_slice)s)+%(var)s[%(slice2)s+1:]" % \
             { "var": var, "var_with_slice": var_with_slice, "slice1": slice_[0], "slice2": slice_[1] }
        # somewhat like c = c[:2] + fn(c[2:7]) + c[7+1:]
        exec line

print a,b,c,d.s,e.s
# >>> [<a> mod] [<b> mod] 01[23456 mod]890 [<d.s> mod] [<e.s> mod]
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this works, thanks! (I only need to modify it with try/except for the slices) –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 18:29

You could do something like this.

def stringMod(inStr):
  return inStr.replace('f', 'g')

str_list = map(stringMod, str_list)
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that once I create str_list, any changes are applied only to this list and not to the original strings. –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 16:35
    
But the changes can't be applied to the original strings, because strings are immutable. –  kindall Aug 24 '11 at 17:12
    
You are right, I should have said "not to the original variables" in my previous comment. –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 17:15

Your do_string_modifications functions need to be changed so that they return the new string value instead of attempting to modify it in place (since that is not possible). Use your new functions to modify the list, and reassign the original string references to the new values in the list after the modification (if necessary):

str_lst = [a, b, d.s, c[2:7], e.s]
str_lst = [do_string_modifications1(x) for x in str_lst]
str_lst = [do_string_modifications2(x) for x in str_lst]
a, b, d.s, c[2:7], e.s = str_lst
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this would work but I would need to write the last line of your code after each string modification. If, later on, I need to modify the list of the strings, I would have to modify this line on many places. Is there no more efficient way? –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 16:41

It is not possible in the generality that you want. The biggest hurdle are the slice operations you gave, c[2:7] and e.s[:]. These expressions are no lvalues, you cannot assign to them. They just produce new string values, which you have to capture or they are gone.

If you just had lvalues (a, b, d.s), expressions you can assign to, you could think of something, but with c[2:7] and e.s[:], it is not possible.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not need to assign to a slice itself - for example, modifying c[2:7] inplace means modifying string c[2] inplace, string c[3] inplace etc. Sorry if this was confusing - I will adjust the question accordingly. –  jvm Aug 24 '11 at 18:12

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