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I've been asked to make dictionaries inside a class thread safe.

My first proposal was to implement a thread safe dictionary, the community of .net developers had already worked on that but it was rejected.

The code is something like this:

class Example()
{
    Dictionary<string, string> dic1;
    Dictionary<string, string> dic2;
     public void Example()
     {
        dic1 = new Dictionary<string,string>(10);
        dic2 = new Dictionary<string,string>(10);
     }

     public string Method1(string param1)
     {
            if(dic1.ContainsKey(param1))
            {
                return dic1[param1];
            }

            if(IsValidParam(param1))
            {
                dic1.Add(param1, param1);
                return param1;
            }

            try
            {   
                var params = GetValidParams(param1);
                if(params.Count > 0)
                {
                    foreach(var param in params)
                    {
                        if(!isValirParam(param)
                            continue;

                        dic1.Add(param1, param);

                        if(!dic2.ContainsKey(param1))
                        {
                            dic2.Add(param, param1);
                        }

                        return param;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    dic2.Add(param1, param1);
                    return param1;
                }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                .....
            }

            return param1;
     }
}

This is only one of the many methods that have read and write access to both of the dictionaries inside the same method.

I was thinking on refactoring and use "ReaderWriterLockSlim" in each Add and return, but I don't know if this is going to make this thread safe.

Do you have any idea how to approach this? I'm open to suggestions...

Thanks in advance for your time

share|improve this question
    
Take a look at ConcurrentDictionary. Maybe it will cover your needs. –  Pashec Aug 24 '11 at 17:58
    
Since actions against one dictionary are dependent on tests of values in the other, ConcurrentDictionary helps, but seems insufficient by itself. –  hatchet Aug 24 '11 at 18:03
    
I'm sticking to framework 3.5 by now, we won't move on to 4.0 until next year =\ sorry not to mention that –  hyeomans Aug 24 '11 at 18:14
1  
imagine thread A executing that method, and param1 is not in dic1 (so that first return is skipped). Before doing anything more, thread B comes along running the same code, with param1 still not in dic1. This is the problem you need to solve: both threads running through this method, thread A a little ahead of thread B, so thread B's assumptions about param1 from earlier tests change between the time thread B does a test, and when it acts on the result of the test. –  hatchet Aug 24 '11 at 18:19
1  
I agree with Tridus' answer although if your class has a lot of methods, with some calling others, it can get complicated. Think of the two dictionaries as one thing, identify the atomic operations against that thing (test+read+write is an atomic operation for example), and wrap these operations in a lock. A good free resource: albahari.com/threading –  hatchet Aug 24 '11 at 18:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simplest way in this case to ensure that you're going to get what you expect is to use a lock.

class Example()
{
    Dictionary<string, string> dic1;
    Dictionary<string, string> dic2;
    private Object syncRoot;
     public void Example()
     {
        dic1 = new Dictionary<string,string>(10);
        dic2 = new Dictionary<string,string>(10);
        syncRoot = new Object();
     }

     public string Method1(string param1)
     {
         lock(syncRoot) {
            if(dic1.ContainsKey(param1))
            {
                return dic1[param1];
            }

            if(IsValidParam(param1))
            {
                dic1.Add(param1, param1);
                return param1;
            }

            try
            {   
                var params = GetValidParams(param1);
                if(params.Count > 0)
                {
                    foreach(var param in params)
                    {
                        if(!isValirParam(param)
                            continue;

                        dic1.Add(param1, param);

                        if(!dic2.ContainsKey(param1))
                        {
                            dic2.Add(param, param1);
                        }

                        return param;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    dic2.Add(param1, param1);
                    return param1;
                }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                .....
            }

            return param1;
          }
     }
}

Note that this will make things slower (lock has some overhead and in particular you won't have two threads executing anything inside the lock'd block at the same time), but it ensures that Thread2 running this method can't change something in between when Thread1 tested a value and when it then tries to use the result of that test to do something. It also doesn't require .net 4, so you'll be able to use it.

edit - It's also worth mentioning that if you have any other methods that modify either dictionary, you'll want to lock them the same way. The key thing here is that only one thread can be messing around with stuff at any given moment of time.

share|improve this answer
    
would that block the callings to: var params = GetValidParams(param1); ? –  hyeomans Aug 24 '11 at 18:44
    
@YeomansLeo Only if GetValidParams in turn calls Method1 again. That's an area where this locking stuff gets tricky and you'd want to use it more selectively then I did (rather then just wrapping the entire method). But since that code wasn't in the original example I just wanted to demonstrate in a straightforward way. :) Essentially the lock command says that no other thread can go past lock() until whoever got there first exits the block. It won't block an unrelated method unless there's also a lock in there using the same locking object (syncRoot in this case). –  Tridus Aug 24 '11 at 19:02
    
I applied this, I did a little refactoring I got out the modification of the dictionaries outside the scope of the foreach statement. Thanks for all you answers! –  hyeomans Aug 26 '11 at 15:52

On .NET 4 there is already ConcurrentDictionary<T,V>.

share|improve this answer
2  
That doesn't solve the problem in this case, because two of them are being manipulated at the same time. Just making the dictionaries themselves thread safe doesn't make the whole operation thread safe. –  Tridus Aug 24 '11 at 18:12
    
I'm sticking to framework 3.5 by now, we won't move on to 4.0 until next year =\ sorry not to mention that –  hyeomans Aug 24 '11 at 18:14
    
@Tridus: Since the operation is simply adding them to the dictionaries, I'm not sure why it isn't. Obviously, he can't just replace every instance of Dictionary with ConcurrentDictionary –  Marc Aug 24 '11 at 18:14
1  
@Marc - Because he's doing something to dict2 based in part on results of tests on dict1. Even if both dicts are threadsafe by themselves, a thread interrupted after the test on dict1 but before doing something to dict2 is going to do inconsistent things if another thread comes along and modifies them. –  Tridus Aug 24 '11 at 18:29

Like Tridus said you are pretty much going to have to wrap the entire contents of Method1 in a lock. However, this may be one scenario where ReaderWriterLockSlim might actually help. You could take a read lock on the initial lookup in dic1. If it succeeds then you can bail out without ever taking the exclusive write lock. If the lookup fails then you upgrade to a write lock. You would have to test of course, but if the initial lookup is expected to succeed most of the time then you could gain a lot of concurrency.

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