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I'm trying to figure out how to accomplish this workflow, but can't seem to nail it. I've got n number of <select> elements on a page. When the page loads, for each <select> element, I need to make a $.get(...); call. Once all of those calls are done, then, and only then do I need to run an additional function. Here is some example code to better explain:

function doWork(selectEl) {
    var getData = ...; // build request data based on selectEl

    $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function (data) {
        // Do something to selectEl with the result
    });
}

function doMoreWork() {
    // Do something with all the selects now that they are ready
}

$(function () {
    // For each of the select elements on the page
    $('select').each(function(index, selectEl) {
        // Go do some AJAX-fetching of additional data
        doWork(selectEl);
    });

    // Once *all* the $.get(...) calls are done, do more things
    doMoreWork();
});

Using the code above, doMoreWork() is usually called before all of the async $.get(...); calls have had a chance to return; which is not what I want. I need to have all of the $.get(...); calls complete before doMoreWork() can be called. Basically I need a callback of sorts to execute once ALL of the $.get(...); calls in the above example have finished.

How would I go about accomplishing this?

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Use deferred.then() –  epascarello Aug 24 '11 at 19:24
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Keep track of how many Ajax calls have yet to complete, and execute doMoreWork() when there are none left.

$(function(){
    var workLeft = $('select').length;

    function doWork(selectEl) {
        var getData = ...; // build request data based on selectEl

        $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function (data) {
            // Do something to selectEl with the result

            // If done all work
            if(!(--workLeft)){
                doMoreWork();
            }                
        });
    }

    function doMoreWork() {
        // Do something with all the selects now that they are ready
    }

    // For each of the select elements on the page
    $('select').each(function(index, selectEl) {
        // Go do some AJAX-fetching of additional data
        doWork(selectEl);
    });
});

You may also want to catch ajax errors.

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1  
+1 Using .length is a sensible way to initialize the counter unless there's some other code that determines whether or not doWork should run. (And that doesn't seem to be the case.) –  user113716 Aug 24 '11 at 19:57
    
Thanks for the response. This is really straight forward and integrates well into my existing code. –  ckittel Aug 24 '11 at 20:45
    
Why re-invent the wheel? jQuery's Deferred already provides a way to do that... –  shesek Aug 24 '11 at 20:55
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  1. Every time you call doWork, increment a counter.

  2. Every time a response comes back, decrement the counter.

  3. Have the callback invoke doMoreWork when the counter reaches 0.

var counter = 0;

function doWork(selectEl) {
    counter++;
    var getData = ...; // build request data based on selectEl

    $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function (data) {
        counter--;
        if( !counter ) { doMoreWork(); }
    });
}

function doMoreWork() {
    // Do something with all the selects now that they are ready
}

$(function () {
    // For each of the select elements on the page
    $('select').each(function(index, selectEl) {
        // Go do some AJAX-fetching of additional data
        doWork(selectEl);
    });
});
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1  
doMoreWork could technically (but unrealistically) execute more than once here, if the ajax request is super fast and somehow returns a result before the next iteration of .each() –  Paulpro Aug 24 '11 at 19:28
1  
@PaulPRO: I hear what you're saying, but I don't think that's right. Consider that the .each() is synchronous. Just because the function being invoked by .each() is running some asynchronous code doesn't change the synchronous nature of the .each(). This means that the .each() will complete before the first callback is allowed to run, even if it returns before the each is complete. –  user113716 Aug 24 '11 at 19:31
1  
It won't, unless $.get has some kind of optimization internally to return immediately instead of making an asynchronous request when the data is already available. Asynchronous requests + javascript is single-threaded = any of these sorts of approaches should be safe. –  Karl Knechtel Aug 24 '11 at 19:32
    
+1 Thanks for the response. This was a very clear answer and certainly gets the job done. –  ckittel Aug 24 '11 at 20:46
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I would write a class something like:

function synchronizer(query, action, cleanup) {
    this.query = query;
    this.action = action;
    this.cleanup = cleanup;
    this.remaining = query.length;
    this.complete = function() {
        this.remaining -= 1;
        if (this.remaining == 0) { this.cleanup(query); }
    }
    this.run = function() {
        query.each(function(index, which) { action(which, this.complete); })
    }
}

// Aargh. Expecting doWork() to call a passed-in continuation seems ugly to me
// as opposed to somehow wrapping doWork within the synchronizer... but I can't
// think of a way to make that work.

function doWork(element, next) {
    var getData = ...; // build request data based on element

    $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function(data) {
        // Do something to element with the result, and then
        next();
    });
}

function doMoreWork(elements) {
    // Do something with all the selects now that they are ready
}

new synchronizer($('select'), doWork, doMoreWork).run();
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+1 Nice........ –  user113716 Aug 24 '11 at 20:06
    
When does this.complete() get executed on each pass to do the necessary decrementing? In doWork() somewhere? –  ckittel Aug 24 '11 at 20:33
    
@ckittel, yes, doWork() should probably pass that as the success callback to $.ajax (or $.get or whatever) –  shesek Aug 24 '11 at 20:46
    
+1 I love the generic reusability of this. My OP example was more simplistic than my actual code making this solution not really suitable, but might be with a bit more tweaking. I'll keep this in mind for future situations indeed! –  ckittel Aug 24 '11 at 20:47
    
@shesek yeah, something like that. I didn't really think that part through; let me see if I can work out something that doesn't involve too much coupling... –  Karl Knechtel Aug 24 '11 at 21:02
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You can use jQuery's $.when to join together multiple Deferred objects to one:

$.when.apply($, $('select').map(function(index, selectEl) {
    return $.ajax(....);
}).get()).done(function() {
    // All AJAX calls finished
});

Basically, $.when takes multiple Deferred objects as each argument and wraps them together as one Deferred by keeping track of the number of completed sub-deferres, similar to how a couple of the answers here implemented it manually.

A more readable version of the above code is:

var requests = [];
$('select').each(function(index, selectEl) {
    request.push($.ajax(....));
}
$.when.apply($, requests).done(function() {
    // All AJAX calls finished
});
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Maybe you could use the JavaScript underscore library's after function.

(note: I haven't tested this code)

var numberOfSelectElements = n;
var finished = _after(numberOfSelectElements, doMoreWork);

function doWork(selectEl) {
    var getData = ...; // build request data based on selectEl

    $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function (data) {
        finished();
    });
}

function doMoreWork() {
    // Do something with all the selects now that they are ready
}

$(function () {
    // For each of the select elements on the page
    $('select').each(function(index, selectEl) {
        // Go do some AJAX-fetching of additional data
        doWork(selectEl);
    });
});
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+1 Wow, the _after function in this library is pretty handy! I'm not about to onboard an additional library for this project, but will keep it in mind for future projects. –  ckittel Aug 24 '11 at 20:49
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Use Deferred:

function doWork(selectEl) {
    var getData = ...;

    // return Deferred object
    return $.get('/foo/bar', getData, function (data) {

    });
}


var selects = $('select');

function doItem(i) {
    if(selects.length === i) return doMoreWork(); // if no selects left, abort and do more work
    $.when(doWork(selects.get(i)).then(function() { // fetch and do next if completed
        doItem(i + 1);
    });
});

doItem(0); // start process
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Doesn't this approach mean that if one AJAX request stalls, all the others are held up by it? –  Karl Knechtel Aug 24 '11 at 19:33
    
@Karl Knechtel: I don't think so. The documentation for .then says: "Add handlers to be called when the Deferred object is resolved or rejected." –  pimvdb Aug 24 '11 at 19:34
    
Does "rejected" really cover "stalled"? I would think it means that the request can't complete. A stalled request can complete, it just isn't known when the other server will send the rest of the data. –  Karl Knechtel Aug 24 '11 at 19:38
    
@Karl Knechtel: I'm sorry, I misread. Yes it does, because it isn't unril the .when finishes that it executes .then and starts the next one. So it's kind of synchronous this way... –  pimvdb Aug 24 '11 at 19:39
    
The object returned from jQuery's AJAX functions implement the Promise object, you can use the success(callback) method directly on it - no need to use $.when –  shesek Aug 24 '11 at 19:50
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Since it looks like you're doing jQuery, you could use the $.ajaxStop event handler... http://api.jquery.com/ajaxStop/

EDIT Said $.ajaxComplete instead of the correct $.ajaxStop... Fixed now...

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Ah damn... Sorry... I meant to say $.ajaxStop... –  Gísli Konráð Aug 24 '11 at 19:32
    
This is fired every time an AJAX request is completed, not when all of them are completed (which isn't really possible for jQuery to implement, as he can't tell what 'all' is) –  shesek Aug 24 '11 at 19:49
1  
@shesek - fróm the jquery website: " Description: Register a handler to be called when all Ajax requests have completed. This is an Ajax Event." –  Gísli Konráð Aug 24 '11 at 23:39
1  
jsfiddle.net/tAgqL/3 –  Gísli Konráð Aug 29 '11 at 11:06
    
cool, thanks for writing a jsfiddle for it! apparently I didn't know what ajaxStop actually does, my bad :-) its still problematic as jQuery's definition of 'all' and his definition of 'all' in this context are different - there could be other AJAX requests running in the same time that shouldn't be taken into consideration, or ajaxStop could be triggered by previous requests that just finished between setting up the event listener and starting to send more requests –  shesek Aug 31 '11 at 0:22
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