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Given the following models:

Room (id, title)
RoomMembers (id, room_id)
RoomFeed, also an observer

When a Room title is updated, I want to create a RoomFeed item, showing who the user is who made the update.

@room.update_attributes(:title => "This is my new title")

Problem is in my observer for RoomFeed:

def after_update(record)
   # record is the Room object
end

The is no way for me to get the user.id of the person who just made the update. How do I go about doing that? is there a better way to do the update so I get the current_user?

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See stackoverflow.com/questions/7167822/… –  lucapette Aug 24 '11 at 19:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think what you are looking for is, room.updated_by inside your observer. If you don't want to persist the updated_by, just declare it as an attr_accessor. Before you push the update, make sure you assign the current_user to updated_by, may be from you controller.

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This is a typical "separation of concern" issue.

The current_user lives in the controller and the Room model should know nothing about it. Maybe a RoomManager model could take care of who's changing the name on the doors...

Meanwhile a quick & dirty solution would be to throw a (non persistant) attribute at Room.rb to handle the current_user....

# room.rb
class Room
  attr_accessor :room_tagger_id
end

and pass your current_user in the params when updating @room.

That way you've got the culprit! :

def after_update(record)
   # record is the Room object
   current_user = record.room_tagger_id
end
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Create the following

class ApplicationController
  before_filter :set_current_user

  private
  def set_current_user
    User.current_user = #however you get the current user in your controllers
  end
end

class User
   ...
   def self.current_user
     @@current_user
   end
   def self.current_user= c
     @@current_user = c
   end
   ...
end

Then use...

User.current_user wherever you need to know who is logged in.  

Remember that the value isn't guaranteed to be set when your class is called from non-web requests, like rake tasks, so you should check for .nil?

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I like this solution, because this keeps the concerns separated nicely. The Room model does not need to know the current_user, and the observer can access it if needed. I use this exact approach myself as well. If the current_user is not set, I default to a SYSTEM user (e.g. so updates from within the console keep working, and are still clearly marked). –  nathanvda Aug 25 '11 at 21:45
3  
This is not a good idea because in production the values of the class variables will not be cleared between requests. Also this method isn't thread safe. –  Reed G. Law Mar 22 '12 at 15:31
    
If you're doing this in a before filter then it should be executing at the beginning of every call, so you'd be ok in a Rails environment running with single threads per request. –  Brian Glick Mar 27 '12 at 0:21

Update user.rb

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  cattr_accessor :current
end

Update application_controller.rb

class ApplicationController
  before_filter :set_current_user

  private
  def set_current_user
    User.current = current_user
  end
end

Then you can get logged user by User.current anywhere. I'm using this approach to access user exactly in observers.

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cattr_accessor :current should be attr_accessor :current –  ajt Mar 20 '13 at 14:52
    
@ajt no, it's a class attribute, that's why cattr –  Stefan Huska Mar 26 '13 at 0:26
    
gg soz my bad :P –  ajt Mar 26 '13 at 15:37
2  
This is insane. You open yourself to 1) attacks where the next request reuse the old User.current of the previous requests 2) Let's not even talk about running a Threaded server 3) Prevent ActiveRecord from reloading its association cache properly when running in dev mode –  Nicolas Viennot Jul 8 '13 at 7:14

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