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Silly question I know,

From all the tutorials they do not explain why they use $this.

Is $this like an object from a base class in Codeigniter?

Any explanation would be welcomed! :)

Thanks

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3  
php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.basic.php for an introduction on $this itself. –  mario Aug 24 '11 at 19:35
3  
By the way, there are no silly questions, only badly formulated ones. Don't hesitate to ask if you have difficulties understanding something ;) –  Luwe Aug 24 '11 at 19:44
    
+1 Exactly the question I wanted to ask... –  Highly Irregular Dec 2 '12 at 22:21

6 Answers 6

To actually answer your question, $this actually represents the singleton Codeigniter instance (which is actually the controller object).

For example when you load libraries/models, you're attaching them to this instance so you can reference them as a property of this instance.

Another way to get this instance in codeigniter is the get_instance() function that you use when building portable libraries.

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$this in PHP is the current object. In a class definition, you use $this to work with the current object. Take this class as an example:

class Hello {
  public $data = 'hello';
  function hi() {
    $this->data = 'hi';
  }
}

You can instantiate this class multiple times, but $data will only be changed to hi in those objects where you called the function:

$one = new Hello;
$two = new Hello;
$two->hi();

echo $one->data, "\n", $two->data;
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2  
Sure this is a fine tutorial on the generic meaning of $this but does not address codeigniter specifically, which is what the question is about. –  jondavidjohn Aug 24 '11 at 20:35

$this isn't something from CodeIgniter, but from PHP. $this refers to the current object.

Whenever you create an instance like this:

$something = new SomeClass();

Then $this refers to the instance that is created from SomeClass, in this case $something. Whenever you are in the class itself, you can use $this to refer to this instance. So:

class SomeClass {

  public $stuff = 'Some stuff';

  public function doStuff()
  {
    $this->stuff;
  }

}
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Haha, some people were way faster –  Luwe Aug 24 '11 at 19:41
    
Thanks, so basically its similar to C++ in the sense that this.stuff() –  sqlmole Aug 24 '11 at 19:53
    
I have no experience with C++, but yes, it probably implements this in the same way. –  Luwe Aug 24 '11 at 20:11

In terms of codeigniter:
You'll notice that each controller in codeigniter extends the base controller class. Using $this in a controller gives you access to everything which is defined in your controller, as well as what's inherited from the base controller.

Most of the use you'll get out of $this involves calling methods which the base class has loaded for you - $this->load, $this->uri, etc.

If I remember correctly, PHP code in a view is run in the context of the controller, so you'll have access to the controller object with $this from there as well.

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I just read a great post about $this and classes in general: http://query7.com/using-this-in-php

In PHP, the keyword “$this” is used as a self reference of a class and you can use it for calling and using these properties and methods as shown in the example bellow.

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In terms of codeigniter: You'll notice that each controller in codeigniter extends the base controller class. Using $this in a controller gives you access to everything which is defined in your controller, as well as what's inherited from the base controller.

Most of the use you'll get out of $this involves calling methods which the base class has loaded for you - $this->load, $this->uri, etc.

If I remember correctly, PHP code in a view is run in the context of the controller, so you'll have access to the controller object with $this from there as well.

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