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I'm still on the road to enlightenment in C++, so bear with me...

Suppose I have a struct:

struct MyThing 
{
    int a, b;
};

I fancy creating one using the c-style shorthand, Fig.1:

MyThing mt = { 1, 2 };

Then suppose I decide to stick a method somewhere in my struct, and (being the kind of person that I am) I feel structs don't really suit methods, so turn it into a class:

class MyThing 
{
public:
    int a, b;
    int sum() 
    {
        return a + b;
    }
};

My Fig.1 still works fine - everything's hunky dory. Then I decide I'll eventually need a private method and member:

class MyThing 
{
private:
    int c;
    void swap() {
        c = a;
        a = b;
        b = c;
    }
public:
    int a, b;
    int sum() 
    {
        return a + b;
    }
};

At this point, the c-style initialization list in Fig.1 fails to compile (in VS anyway) with "non-aggregates cannot be initialized with initializer list" - which is nicely explained here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0s6730bb(v=vs.71).aspx

So I switch to:

class MyThing 
{
private:
    void swap() {
        int c = a;
        a = b;
        b = c;
    }
public:
    int a, b;
    MyThing (int _a, int _b) : a(_a), b(_b) {}
    int sum() 
    {
        return a + b;
    }
};

then change Fig.1 to (Fig.2)

MyThing mt(1, 2);

Sooooo, after all that, my question is: is there any benefit of using c-style initialization lists (i.e. are they faster?) for creating things? Or would it do just as well in the first place to have:

struct MyThing
{
    int a, b;
    MyThing(int _a, int _b) : a(_a), b(_b) {}
};

And use it as fig.2 from the beginning? Is there any performance hit at all (even if it's negligible)?

Thank you!

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1  
"are they faster" - I would recommend using whatever is most natural and only worry about faster if you genuinely hit a bottleneck. If you're doing this in a tight loop then there might be other issues... –  Flexo Aug 24 '11 at 19:38
    
And the answer is "no", they aren't any faster than a proper initialization list. –  Mooing Duck Aug 24 '11 at 19:47
    
@Mooing Duck - that's roughly the conclusion I was coming to - that although creating things with shorthand saves typing, when they're nested (i.e. nested POD structs), it gets quite horrible to read quite quickly - and instead having constructors, the only extra typing is the class name (and using () instead of {}) - much clearer as what's going on :) And now I agree with awoodland too - worry about performance if it becomes an issue; it's unlikely that if I was worried about performance I'd be creating many, many distinct instances anyway... Thank you for your answers :) –  Seb Aug 25 '11 at 6:43
    
I feel I should add (as reasons for my queries about performance) I've been a Java developer for the past 5 years; in 1 month, I'm moving to a C++ games company - this is all rather new to me! :) –  Seb Aug 25 '11 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, first of all, the example you say fails, does in fact, work. (It doesn't fail until you add the constructor)

Now, remember, that an object is just a piece of memory. Hence the binary image of

MyThing mt = { 1, 2 };        // Fig A

is exactly the same as

int  mt[2] = { 1, 2};         // Fig B.

Hence to implement Fig A or Fig B, the compiler merely has to emit:

mt    DW      0x0001        Fig C
      DW      0x0002

In other words, zero run-time cost.

However, if a ctor is present, then it must be run (that's part of the contract C++ promises). (Unavoidably run-time cost)

Similarly, private members, base class etc, interfere with the one-to-one correspondence needed to handle the compile-time assignment, we have in Fig C.

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However, if the constructor is MyThing(int x, int y) : x_(x), y_(y) { } and is defined inline, it's quite unlikely that there will be any runtime overhead whatsoever. –  James McNellis Aug 24 '11 at 20:23
    
I don't understand why private members make a problem though. Why does the compiler differentiate between different members based on their visibility? A private member will still have its own unique storage space and the compiler obviously knows the offset at compile time. I'm not worried about performance, I just want to understand the language/compiler a bit better :) –  Voo Aug 24 '11 at 23:42
    
Thank you, I've updated the example so that it will make the compiler fail :) –  Seb Aug 25 '11 at 6:37
    
However, if a ctor is present, then it must be run. Technically, no. In C++0x, 1.5.9 states: A conforming implementation executing a well-formed program shall produce the same observable behavior as one of the possible executions of the corresponding instance of the abstract machine with the same program and the same input. Eg, the constructor can run at compile time as well. The program merely has to act as if it had run. –  Mooing Duck Aug 25 '11 at 16:53
    
§ 1.9.1 is clearer: This International Standard places no requirement on the structure of conforming implementations. In particular, they need not copy or emulate the structure of the abstract machine. Rather, conforming implementations are required to emulate (only) the observable behavior of the abstract machine as explained below and 4) Under the “as-if” rule an implementation is allowed to store two objects at the same machine address or not store an object at all if the program cannot observe the difference. –  Mooing Duck Aug 25 '11 at 16:55

is there any benefit of using c-style initialization lists (i.e. are they faster?) for creating things?

Faster, slower, does it really matter? It is generally a lot more convenient syntactically than calling constructors. That's part of the reason C++0x allows you to use this syntax for all objects.

It's possible that aggregate initialization could be free, as a compile-time optimization. It's also possible that the compiler could optimize simple constructors as well. The only way to know is to look at the generated assembly. But unless you have an actual bottleneck, you shouldn't care so much.

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