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I'm fairly new to web development, but I just realized something when designing some new headers/footers. When you wrap them in a container with a background image/color that stretches across the page, then shrink the window of the webpage to be smaller than the intended width, and then scroll across to view the content that you can't see in your smaller window, the background image container is no longer large enough (as it resizes to the width of the window automatically, even though the content in it overflows), and you see whitespace instead of the background image.

Take the homepage at http://www.stumbleupon.com for example. Shrink the window, then scroll to the right. All of a sudden ALL of their background images are gone. Header, body, everything. Just content on top of the flat, default color.

Is there a solution to this? Is this just ignored in web design as an irrelevant concern? It seems fairly relevant to me, especially when doing things like viewing multiple tabs/windows at one time, or if someone is (god forbid) using a monitor with a resolution width smaller than 1024.

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1 Answer 1

StumbleUpon have just been careless with container divs. They've set a container div with a width of 100% and then the header div inside that is set to 100% of that.

<div id="container" style="width:100%">
    <div id="header" style="width:100%">
        Header Content
    </div>
</div>

The container div stretches to the visible window width. The sub-div then only stretches to that divs width. If you put the header outside of the container div it will stretch to the full width of the page.

<div id="header" style="width:100%">
        Header Content
</div>
<div id="container" style="width:100%">

</div>

See my homepage: http://smallhadroncollider.com for an example of full width headers.

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In actual fact, if the div is relatively positioned, which it will be by default, you don't even need to set it to have 100% width. –  Small Hadron Collider Aug 25 '11 at 10:26
    
I followed your website as an example, removing width measurements and making sure everything was positioned relative, but I cannot figure out how your header container keeps a minimum width of 960. I have a header container, a header div, and a couple divs for the content inside of it. The header container has relative positioning, a height, and the background settings. The header div has relative position, a height, width (960px), and margin 0 auto. And yet, when I resize the window, the header div remains at 960px, while the parent div still resizes to be smaller than 960. –  Mit Aug 25 '11 at 14:34
    
The quick solution for me is min-width, but I know I should be able to avoid using that. –  Mit Aug 25 '11 at 14:43

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