Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Could anyone provide a comparison or specific details of how is template instantiation handled at compile and/or link time in GCC and MS compilers? Is this process different in the context of static libraries, shared libraries and executables? I found this doc about how GCC handles it but I'm not sure if the information is still referring to the current state of things. Should I use the flags they suggest there when compiling my libraries e.g. -fno-implicit-templates?

What I know (might not necessarily be correct) is that:

  • templates will be instantiated when actually used
  • templates will be instantiated as a result of explicit instantiations
  • duplicate instantiation is usually handled by folding duplicate instantiations, or by deferring instantiation until link time
share|improve this question
8  
Why the downvote? –  celavek Aug 26 '11 at 22:18
    
And now is the moment to look like a total dork(the story of my life): I think the downvote is there just to account for the bounty(as I got immediately subtracted the 50 reputation when I "bountified" the question). –  celavek Sep 1 '11 at 8:49
    
I do not think that bounties change the "value" of a question. –  phresnel Sep 2 '11 at 6:33
    
Well, Microsoft does not implement two phase lookup properly for starters. (this is a euphemism: there is no two phase lookup at all) –  Alexandre C. Jun 6 '12 at 19:31
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted
+25

Point of instantiation

templates will be instantiated when actually used

Not exactly, but roughly. The precise point of instantiation is a bit subtle, and I delegate you over to the section named Point of instantiation in Vandevoorde's/Josuttis' fine book.

However, compilers do not necessarily implement the POIs correctly: Bug c++/41995: Incorrect point of instantiation for function template


Partial instantiation

templates will be instantiated when actually used

That is partially correct. It is true for function templates, but for class templates, only the member functions that are used are instantiated. The following is well-formed code:

#include <iostream>

template <typename> struct Foo {
    void let_me_stay() {
        this->is->valid->code. get->off->my->lawn;
    }

    void fun() { std::cout << "fun()" << std::endl; } 
};


int main () {
    Foo<void> foo;
    foo.fun();
}

let_me_stay() is checked syntactically (and the syntax there is correct), but not semantically (i.e. it is not interpreted).


Two phase lookup

However, only dependent code is interpreted later; clearly, within Foo<>, this is dependent upon the exact template-id with which Foo<> is instantiated, so we postponed error-checking of Foo<>::let_me_alone() until instantiation time.

But if we do not use something that depends on the specific instantiation, the code must be good. Therefore, the following is not well-formed:

$ cat non-dependent.cc
template <typename> struct Foo {
    void I_wont_compile() { Mine->is->valid->code. get->off->my->lawn; }
};
int main () {} // note: no single instantiation

Mine is a completely unknown symbol to the compiler, unlike this, for which the compiler could determine it's instance dependency.

The key-point here is that C++ uses a model of two-phase-lookup, where it does checking for non-dependent code in the first phase, and semantic checking for dependent code is done in phase two (and instantiation time) (this is also an often misunderstood or unknown concept, many C++ programmers assume that templates are not parsed at all until instantiation, but that's only myth coming from, ..., Microsoft C++).


Full instantiation of class templates

The definition of Foo<>::let_me_stay() worked because error checking was postponed to later, as for the this pointer, which is dependent. Except when you would have made use of

explicit instantiations

cat > foo.cc
#include <iostream>

template <typename> struct Foo {
    void let_me_stay() { this->is->valid->code. get->off->my->lawn; }
    void fun() { std::cout << "fun()" << std::endl; } 
};

template struct Foo<void>;
int main () {
    Foo<void> foo;
    foo.fun();
}

g++ foo.cc
error: error: ‘struct Foo<void>’ has no member named ‘is’


Template definitions in different units of translation

When you explicitly instantiate, you instantiate explicitly. And make all symbols visible to the linker, which also means that the template definition may reside in different units of translation:

$ cat A.cc
template <typename> struct Foo {
    void fun();  // Note: no definition
};
int main () {
    Foo<void>().fun();
}

$ cat B.cc
#include <iostream>
template <typename> struct Foo {
    void fun();

};
template <typename T>
void Foo<T>::fun() { 
    std::cout << "fun!" << std::endl;
}  // Note: definition with extern linkage

template struct Foo<void>; // explicit instantiation upon void

$ g++ A.cc B.cc
$ ./a.out
fun!

However, you must explicitly instantiate for all template arguments to be used, otherwise

$ cat A.cc
template <typename> struct Foo {
    void fun();  // Note: no definition
};
int main () {
    Foo<float>().fun();
}
$ g++ A.cc B.cc
undefined reference to `Foo<float>::fun()'
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice point about dependent vs. non-dependent(I certainly was not aware of that). I just checked the following code: template <typename> struct Foo { void I_wont_compile() { this->is->valid->code. get->off->my->lawn; } void Test() { fdsh "s.w" = 6; wtf? } }; int main () { } It compiles fine in VC++ 2008 but does not compile in GCC. Does anyone know why VC++ behaves that way?(maybe because of the overhead incurred at compile time?) –  celavek Sep 1 '11 at 8:46
    
VC++ has had more problems in the past. You may browse the boost-sources and see many workarounds related to (older versions) of VC++. Another bug I am aware of is that you can befriend with template parameters, which would be nice to implement a final class as in C#, but which is actually invalid C++: codeguru.com/cpp/cpp/cpp_mfc/stl/article.php/c4143 . –  phresnel Sep 1 '11 at 9:38
    
Well the bounty has expired whitout having the chance to actually award it, as I haven't been active on the site for a couple of days. I'm not sure how to proceed. Should I open another one(I think this answer deserves the bounty)? –  celavek Sep 4 '11 at 10:51
    
I guess this is okay as is, but thanks anyway :) –  phresnel Sep 5 '11 at 8:31
add comment

Edit: It turns out that what I wrote below is contrary to the C++ standard. It is true for Visual C++, but false for compilers that use "two-phase name lookup".

As far as I know, what you say is correct. Templates will be instantiated when actually used (including when declared as a member of another type, but not when mentioned in a function declaration (that does not have a body)) or as a result of explicit instantiations.

A problem with templates is that if you use the same template (e.g. vector) in several different compilation units (.cpp files), the compiler repeats the work of instantiating the template in each .cpp file, thus slowing down compilation. IIRC, GCC has some (non-standard?) mechanism that can be used to avoid this (but I don't use GCC). But Visual C++ always repeats this work, unless you use explicit template instantiation in a precompiled header (but even this will slow down your compile, since a larger PCH file takes longer to load.) Afterward, the linker then eliminates the duplicates. Note: a comment below linked to a page which tells us that not all compilers operate this way. Some compilers defer function instantiation until link time, which should be more efficient.

A template is not fully instantiated when it is first used. In particular, functions in the template are not instantiated until they are actually called. You can easily verify this by adding a nonsense function to a template you are actively using:

void Test() { fdsh "s.w" = 6; wtf? }

You won't get an error unless you instantiate the template explicitly, or try to call the function.

I expect static libraries (and object files) will store the object code of all templates that were instantiated. But if your program has a certain static library as a dependency, you can't actually call the template functions that were already instantiated therein, at least not in VC++, which always requires the source code (with function bodies) of a template class in order to call functions in it.

I don't think it's possible to call a template function in a shared library (when you don't have the source code of the template function you want to call).

share|improve this answer
    
Even my editor knows that code stinks. Have you even TRIED it? The code is going to be fully parsed but identifiers not resolved (many semantic checks ar postponed to instantiation time). Sometimes for that reason you have to disambiguate template-parameter dependent names (the famous typename keyword, e.g.); At instantiation time, semantic errors on substitution aren't fatal (google SFINAE) –  sehe Aug 26 '11 at 22:11
1  
Yes, I just tried it. There is no compiler error because I don't call Test() from anywhere. Template functions can be understood as glorified macros. Like a macro, you don't get an error if you don't use it. –  Qwertie Aug 26 '11 at 22:14
    
What compiler is that? If there is no compiler error, the compiler is the error. Let me guess. Borland C++? –  sehe Aug 26 '11 at 22:16
2  
@Qwertie: don't get your hopes up: the export feature has been dropped from the standard; see also stackoverflow.com/questions/2441886/… –  sehe Aug 26 '11 at 22:58
2  
@sehe: You're confusing export, which was rarely used and has been dropped, and extern, which declares that the template has already been instantiated in another translation unit. See '[temp.explicit]' paragraph 2. –  Dave S Aug 28 '11 at 0:45
show 17 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.