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I'd like to write a logic test to test for the case when [super init] fails.

I have an init method like this:

- (id)init
{
    if ((self = [super init]) != nil)
    {
        // init my members
    }
    return self;
}

Does anyone know how I can get [super init] to return nil to test this case? "super" is NSObject in this case and I'm currently using SenTestKit for logic tests.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could, but it'd be very complex. You'd need to swizzle init on NSObject (google "method swizzle"). There's really no reason to do that. The only way that NSObject init can fail is if you're completely out of memory, and that's such an obscure case in desktop and mobile apps that the test for it isn't worth the overhead of creating it. You wouldn't even be able to write an ObjC error handler for it, because you're completely out of memory and ObjC can barely function without allocating a little memory.

If you really wanted to test this case, you're better off using a test class that returns nil from init and check that the rest of the system works. But this is, and should be, a really obscure case that I wouldn't pursue.

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OK, point taken. I came across this case as my code coverage report was pointing out that I wasn't testing the case where [super init] was nil. I was hoping to find a solution to improve the coverage, but it sounds like it's not worth it. Thanks for the input. –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 4:33
    
I forgot to mention that I do like the sound of Method Swizzling and I think I'll give that a shot if I decide that it's worth it to add this case. Thanks Rob! –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 5:12

You could interject an intermediate parent class that failed its init method:

@interface InitFailTest : NSObject
{
}

- (id)init;
@end

@implementation InitFailTest
- (id)init
{
    if (gFailSuperInitTest)
        return nil;
    else
        return [super init];
}
@end

@interface MyClass : InitFailTest  // instead of NSObject
...

But that's seems a bit heavyweight. If your parent class is NSObject, then honestly I wouldn't worry too much about testing if its init method fails. If your parent class is something else and it has documented failure conditions, then of course you should test those.

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I like this solution because it doesn't litter the code with preprocessor lines, but it also makes my implementation look a little weird to have InitFailTest as it's base class. I'm going to have to think about this one a little more. I was kind of hoping for some kind of macro to insert in my test code that would tell the next NSObject init to fail. I'm pretty sure I've seen something like that with Symbian. Anyway, I appreciate the suggestion Adam. –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 4:27

You can add a #define statement such as #define INIT_FAIL_TESTING. Then, in the parent of the class you want to test (assuming you have access to it), place the following at the beginning of its init method:

#if INIT_FAIL_TESTING
return nil
#endif

or alternatively, in the class you actually want to test, do the following:

- (id)init
{
#if INIT_FAIL_TESTING
    self = nil;
#else
    self = [super init];
#endif

    if (self == nil) {
    //...
    }
    return self;
}

The second option is probably better, since it does not require you to have access to the parent class, and you should be able to assume that anything the parent would be doing in its init method did not happen at all. You're simply testing for whether you received a valid parent instance, which you clearly don't by setting self to nil.

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Unfortunately, I'd like to be able to compile and test both situations (where [super init] succeeds and fails). –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 4:30
    
Yeah, that's definitely a weakness of that setup, but there really isn't another way to test without injecting classes into your hierarchy, which doesn't seem worth it for any class that doesn't require obtaining a rare resource to properly init. For NSObject to fail to init, you pretty much have to be out of virtual memory. –  matthias Aug 25 '11 at 15:46
    
Well, I'm seriously considering trying Rob Napier's suggestion of method swizzling. That looks like a possible solution without injecting classes :) –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 17:11

If all you're doing is testing the case where [super init] is nil, couldn't you just replace it with nil and see what happens?

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Actually, I was trying to improve the code coverage for code like the example I gave. It's already able to test the case where [super init] is successful, but I'd really like to be able to test both situations without changing the code. –  JonnyBoy Aug 25 '11 at 4:35

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