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I have an assignment that I need to create a custom C type string class in C++. I am having trouble getting this to work. Currently my code crashes with a run time error right at the start. I also know many of my function are wrong but I want to get the member functions sorted before I go on and fix the other functions. Bear in mind that all the function prototypes were given to us and I can not change them. I need to write the 'guts' so to speak.

What is wrong with my constructor for a start?

#include <iostream>
#include "tstr.h"
using namespace std;

//Default constructor to initialize the string to null
TStr::TStr() {
    strPtr = 0;
    strSize = 0;
}  
//constructor; conversion from the char string
TStr::TStr(const char *str) {
    int i=0;
    while (str[i] != '/0') {
        strPtr = new char [strlen(str)+1];
        for (i=0; i <strSize;++i) {
            strPtr[i] = str[i];
        }
        ++i;
    }
    strSize = i;
} 
//Copy constructor
TStr::TStr(const TStr&) {
}
//Destructor
TStr::~TStr() {
    if (strPtr) {
        delete[] strPtr;
    }
}

//subscript operators-checks for range
char& TStr::operator [] (int i) {
    assert (i >= 0 && i < strSize);
    return strPtr[i];
}
const char& TStr::operator [] (int i) const {
    assert (i >= 0 && i < strSize);
    return strPtr[i];
}

//overload the concatenation oprerator
TStr TStr::operator += (const TStr& str) {
    //this->strPtr += str.strPtr;
    //this->strSize += str.strSize;
    return *this;
}
//overload the assignment operator
const TStr& TStr::operator = (const TStr& str) {
    if (this != &str) {
        delete[] strPtr;
        strPtr = new char[strSize = str.strSize];
        assert(strPtr);
        for (int i=0; i<strSize; ++i) {
            strPtr[i] = str.strPtr[i];
        }
    }
    return *this;
}

//overload two relational operators as member functions
bool TStr::operator == (const TStr& str) const {
    return (strPtr == str.strPtr && strSize == str.strSize);
}
bool TStr::operator < (const TStr& str) const {
    return (strPtr < str.strPtr && strSize < str.strSize);
}
//the length of the string
int TStr::size() {
    return strSize;
}

Thanks for any replies/help! :)

EDIT 1: Okay the constructor is now working but I am still getting a runtime error and I'm 90% sure it is to do with my overloaded += operator. It looks fine though and compiles okay. What am I missing?

(Note: Only small changes have been made to the above code, but let me know if you want to see the whole lot.)

//overload the concatenation oprerator
TStr TStr::operator += (const TStr& str) {
    for(int i = 0; i < strSize; ++i) {
        strPtr[i] += str.strPtr[i];
    }
    return *this;
}

EDIT 2: Okay this what I have now. Compiles fine but doesn't actually add the two strings together with the += like it should. Anyone got any ideas?

//overload the concatenation oprerator
TStr TStr::operator += (const TStr& str) {
    char *buffer = new char[strSize + str.strSize + 1];
    strcpy(buffer, strPtr);
    strcat(buffer, str.strPtr);
    delete [] strPtr;
    strPtr = buffer;
    return *this;
}

//overload the assignment operator
const TStr& TStr::operator = (const TStr& str) {
    if (this != &str) {
        delete[] strPtr;
        strPtr = new char[strSize = str.strSize];
        assert(strPtr);
        for (int i=0; i<strSize; ++i) {
            strPtr[i] = str.strPtr[i];
        }
    }
    return *this;
}
share|improve this question
    
I don't know if this is a typo, but it looks like your NULL terminator is using a forward-slash rather than the escape character. – Dawson Aug 24 '11 at 21:51
    
You don't need to check if (strPtr) in your destructor. delete[]ing a NULL pointer is a nop and won't crash. – Seth Carnegie Aug 24 '11 at 21:52
    
Also you probably shouldn't use assert because it's remove in release builds. Use exceptions. – Seth Carnegie Aug 24 '11 at 21:53
    
Also you should make size const. – Seth Carnegie Aug 24 '11 at 21:54
    
I always put in stupid mistakes like that. Thanks for pointing it out in a constructive way! :) – RedFred Aug 24 '11 at 22:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your ctor is pretty much a mess.

You use i for two different things -- at the same time. You also copy the entire contents of str into strPtr once for each character in str.

Basically, you have to decide, are you going to use the C run-time library or not?

Using it:

TStr::TStr(const char *str) 
{
  strSize = strlen(str);
  strPtr = new char [strSize+1];
  strcpy(strPtr, str);
}

not using it:

TStr::TStr(const char *str) 
{
  int i = 0;
  while (str[i] != '\0') 
       ++i;
  strSize = i;
  strPtr = new char [i+1];
  for (i=0; i < strSize;++i)
        strPtr[i] = str[i];
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I went with the second option as our lecturer is always stressing that using C type functions is bad so I assume if I can avoid the C run-time library that is a good thing. – RedFred Aug 24 '11 at 22:22
    
I don't believe this code will null-terminate the new string even though you've allocated a string of size i+1 ... should the for-loop test be changed to i <= strSize so that the null-terminating character at the end of str is copied into strPtr? Or is a null-terminating character not needed? – Jason Aug 24 '11 at 22:23
    
@RedFred: your lecturer is a nut. Besides, the whole task is pretty dumb since I can see absolutely no reason why the string class of the std lib does not serve you well. – Doc Brown Aug 25 '11 at 6:27

To summarize:

  • i is reinitialized in the pointed line
  • strSize is used uninitialized(God knows what's there) in the same line as above; should be strSize = strlen(str);
  • the string terminator chracter is wrong
  • as the man was saying it's kind of a mess

    int i=0;
    while (str[i] != '\0') { // as Seth pointed out it's '\0'
        strPtr = new char [strlen(str)+1];
        for (i=0; i <strSize;++i) { // i is reinitialized here !!!
            strPtr[i] = str[i];
        }
        ++i;
    }
    strSize = i;
    

To be more constructive:

// as James perfectly illustrated
TStr::TStr(const char *str) 
{
  int i = 0;
  while (str[i] != '\0') 
       ++i;
  strSize = i;
  strPtr = new char [i+1];

  while (*strPtr++ = *str++); // with a bit of k&R
} 

//overload the concatenation oprerator
TStr TStr::operator += (const TStr& str) {
    for(int i = 0; i < strSize; ++i) {
        strPtr[i] += str.strPtr[i];
    }
    return *this;
}

Problems:

  • you want to concatenate strings meaning you need a bigger storage to hold both strings together meaning you need to reallocate your char array and you don't do that
  • you don't update the size of your string, it's bigger now isn't it?
  • strPtr[i] += str.strPtr[i]; what you're doing here is really adding integers stored on 8 bits

Solution(I'm absolutely sure it can be improved but should get you started):

//overload the concatenation oprerator
TStr TStr::operator += (const TStr& str) {
    unsigned int i = 0;
    while (str.strPtr[i] != '\0') 
       ++i;
    // allocate the new buffer
    char* newStr = new char[i + strSize + 1];
    // copy the old string
    unsigned int j = 0;
    for (; j < strSize; ++j) 
    {
        newStr[j] = strPtr[j];
    }
    // update the size
    strSize += i;
    // release the old buffer
    delete[] strPtr;
    // finally concatenate
    char* copyPtr = newStr + j;
    while(*copyPtr++ = *(str.strPtr)++);
    // and swap the pointers
    strPtr = newStr;     
    return *this;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Also it's '\0', not '/0' – Seth Carnegie Aug 24 '11 at 21:49
    
@Seth Carnegie completely missed that; i jumped into my eyes at first sight; corrected; thanks – celavek Aug 24 '11 at 21:51

Why two loops one inside the other? You're thinking too hard, to copy characters from one string to another you only need one loop. Here's some code

//constructor; conversion from the char string
TStr::TStr(const char *str) {
    strSize = strlen(str);
    strPtr = new char [strSize+1];
    for (int i=0; i <strSize; ++i) {
        strPtr[i] = str[i];
    }
    strPtr[strSize] = '\0';
}

Much simpler!

share|improve this answer
    
You should do what James Curran suggests and use strcpy, but I wanted to show you how the loop would look it you wrote it properly. – john Aug 24 '11 at 21:59
    
I disagree; if you're writing your own string class, you probably want to know how to manipulate things by hand, so strcpy is taking the easy way out and shorting yourself. – Seth Carnegie Aug 24 '11 at 22:03

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