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Suppose I have the following tables:

     ____________________             ____________________
    |     Organisms      |           |       Species      |
    |--------------------|           |--------------------|
    |OrganismId (int, PK)|           |SpeciesId (int, PK) |
    |SpeciesId (int, FK) |∞---------1|Name (varchar)      |
    |Name (varchar)      |           |____________________|
    |____________________|                      1
              1                                 |
              |                                 |
              |                                 |
              ∞                                 ∞
    ______________________        ____________________          _______________
   | OrganismPropsValues  |      |   SpeciesProps     |        |     Props     |
   |----------------------|      |--------------------|        |---------------|
   |OrganismId (int, FK)  |      |PropId (int,PK,FK)  | ∞-----1|PropId (int,PK)|
   |PropId (int, FK)      |      |SpeciesId(int,PK,FK)|        |Name (varchar) |
   |Value (varchar)       |      |____________________|        |_______________|
   |______________________|                                             1
              ∞                                                         |
              |                                                         |
              -----------------------------------------------------------

A quick explanation of what I am trying to represent here: suppose we have a list of species, such as cat, dog, human, etc. We also have a set of properties (abbreviated Props so I could fit it more easily in the diagram) which apply to some but not necessarily all species--for example, this may be tail length (for species with tails), eye color (for those with eyes), etc.

SpeciesProps is a linker table that defines which properties apply to which species-- so here we would have {Human, Eye Color}, {Dog, Eye Color}, {Cat, Eye Color}, {Dog, Tail Length}, {Cat, Tail Length}. We do not have {Human, Tail Length} because Tail Length is obviously not a valid property to apply to a human.

The Organisms table holds actual "implementations" of the species-- So here we might have {Human, Bob}, {Dog, Rufus}, and {Cat, Felix}.

Here is now my issue: in the OrganismPropsValues table, I want to store the 'values' of the properties for each organism--so for example, for Bob I want to store {Bob, Eye Color, Blue}. For Rufus, I would want to store {Rufus, Eye Color, Brown} and {Rufus, Tail Length, 20} (similar for Felix). My problem however, is that in the schema that I have detailed, it is perfectly possible to store {Bob, Tail Length, 10}, even though the {Human, Tail Length} tuple does not exist in SpeciesProps. How can I modify this schema so I can enforce the constraints defined in SpeciesProps in OrganismPropsValues, while maintaining adequate normalization?

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Depending on the DB (for example Oracle) I would just create some Stored Procedures for INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE and implement any complex constraints in there... –  Yahia Aug 24 '11 at 22:29
    
@Yahia thanks for the suggestion, but if there is a way to do this without introducing procedures, triggers, etc. I'd prefer that. This is MS-SQL (2008). –  Andrew Aug 24 '11 at 22:36
    
That made my head hurt. This will be horrible to query (think how many joins it will take to get all the data about a human!)and is such a poor design I don't know where to start. Databases are not Objects and should not be designed like objects. EAV tables are an extremely poor solution. Hire a real database designer. –  HLGEM Aug 24 '11 at 22:44
    
@HLGEM - So can you suggest a better way? I'm not sure why you think it will be horrible to query... Essentially the only thing I will want is the properties for an organism, which would involve two joins. Even if I did want all the data for a human, I can only forsee using two or three joins...I've seen a lot worse before even with databases designed by "real database designers"... –  Andrew Aug 24 '11 at 22:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're implementing the Entity-Attribute-Value antipattern. This can't be a normalized database design, because it's not relational.

What I would suggest instead is the Class Table Inheritance design pattern:

  • Create one table for Organisms, containing properties common to all species.
  • Create one table per species, containing properties specific to that species. Each of these tables has a 1-to-1 relationship with Organisms, but each property belongs in its own column.

     ____________________             ____________________
    |     Organisms      |           |       Species      |
    |--------------------|           |--------------------|
    |OrganismId (int, PK)|           |SpeciesId (int, PK) |
    |SpeciesId (int, FK) |∞---------1|Name (varchar)      |
    |Name (varchar)      |           |____________________|
    |____________________|
              1
              |
              |
              1
     ______________________ 
    |    HumanOrganism     |
    |----------------------|
    |OrganismId (int, FK)  |
    |Sex      (enum)       |
    |Race     (int, FK)    |
    |EyeColor (int, FK)    |
    |....                  |
    |______________________|
    

This does mean you will create many tables, but consider this as a tradeoff with the many practical benefits to storing properties in a relationally correct way:

  • You can use SQL data types appropriately, instead of treating everything a free-form varchar.
  • You can use constraints or lookup tables to restrict certain properties by a predefined set of values.
  • You can make properties mandatory (i.e. NOT NULL) or use other constraints.
  • Data and indexes are stored more efficiently.
  • Queries are easier for you to write and easier for the RDBMS to execute.

For more on this design, see Martin Fowler's book Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, or my presentation Practical Object-Oriented Models in SQL, or my book, SQL Antipatterns: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Database Programming.

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Thanks for the alternative suggestion... I will look into this pattern. –  Andrew Aug 24 '11 at 23:29

Hmm...
Here is one way to do it:
Add SpeciesPropsId into SpeciesProps table.
Replace PropId with SpeciesPropsId in the OrganismPropsValues table.
You will need to change constrains a bit.
Need to add SpeciesProps to OrganismPropsValues constrain.
Need to remove OrganismPropsValues to Props constrain.

Technically you do not have to remove PropId from OrganismPropsValues, but if you keep it it will make data redundat.

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Whenever you have a diamond-shaped dependency like this, consider putting more emphasis on composite PRIMARY KEYS.

Specifically, identify the Organism not just by OrganismId, but by the combination of SpeciesId and OrganismSubId (you can still have OrganismId, but keep it as an alternate key - not show here for brevity).

Once you do that, your model can be made to look like this:

ER Model

The key thing to note here is that SpeciesId is "propagated" down both edges of this diamond-shaped graph. This is what gives you the desired restriction of not being able "assign a value" to a property that was not "declared" for the given species.

BTW, use singular when naming your tables. Also, consider using natural primary keys (e.g. SpeciesName instead of SpeciesId as PK) - if done right it can significantly increase the speed of your JOINs (especially in conjunction with clustering).

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Another way to achieve these constraints would be to change the PK of Organism table by dropping OrganismId and adding a No. Then make PK the compound (SpeciesId, No). So, "Bob" would be (Human, 1), "Rufus" would be (Dog, 1), etc.

Then, add in the OrganismPropsValues table, the SpeciesId and the No (removing the OrganismId.)

This will allow to change the FK from OrganismPropsValues to Props to reference SpeciesProps instead:

     ____________________             ____________________
    |     Organisms      |           |       Species      |
    |--------------------|           |--------------------|
    |SpeciesId (int, FK) |           |SpeciesId (int, PK) |
    |No (int)            |∞---------1|Name (varchar)      |
    |Name (varchar)      |           |____________________|
    |PK (SpeciedId,No)   |                      1
    |____________________|                      |
              1                                 |
              |                                 |
              |                                 |
              ∞                                 ∞
    ______________________        ____________________          _______________
   | OrganismPropsValues  |      |   SpeciesProps     |        |     Props     |
   |----------------------|      |--------------------|        |---------------|
   |SpeciesId (int, PK)   |      |PropId (int,PK,FK)  | ∞-----1|PropId (int,PK)|
   |No (int, PK)          |      |SpeciesId(int,PK,FK)|        |Name (varchar) |
   |PropId (int, PK)      |      |____________________|        |_______________|
   |Value (varchar)       |                 1
   |FK (SpeciesId,No)     |                 |
   |FK (SpeciesId,PropId) |                 |
   |______________________|                 |
              ∞                             |
              |                             |
              -------------------------------
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What @HLGEM refers to with the "EAV" issue is the OrganismPropsValues.Value field. There is no easy way to have integrity checks on that field as it can store different types of data. For example, you avoid storing {Bob, Tail Length, 10} with this db structure but you can't avoid {Rufus, Tail Length, Blue} or {Bob, Eye Color, 20}. –  ypercube Aug 24 '11 at 23:07
    
Thanks-- I've heard the basics on EAV before, but have never used one in practice. This is really a side project I'm working on--not like I'm about to put it into production software--but the data I'm trying to model here seems to call for it. Of course any suggestions for alternatives are welcome--I'm not set upon using it. –  Andrew Aug 24 '11 at 23:12

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