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I'm trying to build a layout in HTML5 and after reading several different articles I'm just confused. I'm trying to get some input on how it should be used.

Below is the variations I'm going back and forth with:

1)

<section id="content">
      <h1>Heading</h1>
      <div id="primary">
         Some text goes here...
      </div>
   </section>

Can you use the section tag to act like a container?

2)

 <div id="content">
      <h1>Heading</h1>
      <section id="primary">
         <article>
            <h2>Post Title</h2>
            <p>Some text goes here...</p>
         </article>
      </section>
      <section id="primary">
         <article>
            <h2>Post Title</h2>
            <p>Some text goes here...</p>
         </article>
      </section>
   </div>

What is the correct method to use the <section> tag?

share|improve this question
    
Technically both are correct. – Seth Aug 24 '11 at 22:41
9  
I would say that neither example looks correct... but it's hard to say with only dummy text and no real context since <section> is a semantic tag and not a generic wrapper like <div>. – Wesley Murch Aug 24 '11 at 23:13
12  
You certainly shouldn't have two elements (section or otherwise) with the same id. – Sam Dutton Feb 4 '13 at 11:03

The answer is in the current spec:

The section element represents a generic section of a document or application. A section, in this context, is a thematic grouping of content, typically with a heading.

Examples of sections would be chapters, the various tabbed pages in a tabbed dialog box, or the numbered sections of a thesis. A Web site's home page could be split into sections for an introduction, news items, and contact information.

Authors are encouraged to use the article element instead of the section element when it would make sense to syndicate the contents of the element.

The section element is not a generic container element. When an element is needed for styling purposes or as a convenience for scripting, authors are encouraged to use the div element instead. A general rule is that the section element is appropriate only if the element's contents would be listed explicitly in the document's outline.

Reference:

Also see:

It looks like there's been a lot of confusion about this element's purpose, but the one thing that's agreed upon is that it is not a generic wrapper, like <div> is. It should be used for semantic purposes, and not a CSS or JavaScript hook (although it certainly can be styled or "scripted").

A better example, from my understanding, might look something like this:

<div id="content">
  <article>
     <h2>How to use the section tag</h2>
     <section id="disclaimer">
         <h3>Disclaimer</h3>
         <p>Don't take my word for it...</p>
     </section>
     <section id="examples">
       <h3>Examples</h3>
       <p>But here's how I would do it...</p>
     </section>
     <section id="closing_notes">
       <h3>Closing Notes</h3>
       <p>Well that was fun. I wonder if the spec will change next week?</p>
     </section>
  </article>
</div>

Note that <div>, being completely non-semantic, can be used anywhere in the document that the HTML spec allows it, but is not necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it, spot on. – starskythehutch Aug 24 '11 at 22:43
2  
I'm not sure what the wrapper div is for, but otherwise a good answer. – Alohci Aug 24 '11 at 23:58
    
The wrapper div was from OP's example, just showing how a generic wrapper could be used appropriately in conjunction with the other elements I guess, but of course a div would work almost anywhere. – Wesley Murch Aug 25 '11 at 0:04
7  
Shouldn't the section also contain a heading (h1,h2, etc)? – Joey V. Oct 25 '11 at 14:56
1  
a heading should contain a heading and you shouldn't use it if there is only one element in it. – keinabel Sep 18 '12 at 10:53

In the W3 wiki page about structuring HTML5, it says:

<section>: Used to either group different articles into different purposes or subjects, or to define the different sections of a single article.

And then displays an image that I cleaned up:

enter image description here

It's also important to know how to use the <article> tag (from the same W3 link above):

<article> is related to <section>, but is distinctly different. Whereas <section> is for grouping distinct sections of content or functionality, <article> is for containing related individual standalone pieces of content, such as individual blog posts, videos, images or news items. Think of it this way - if you have a number of items of content, each of which would be suitable for reading on their own, and would make sense to syndicate as separate items in an RSS feed, then <article> is suitable for marking them up.

In our example, <section id="main"> contains blog entries. Each blog entry would be suitable for syndicating as an item in an RSS feed, and would make sense when read on its own, out of context, therefore <article> is perfect for them:

<section id="main">
    <article>
      <!-- first blog post -->
    </article>

    <article>
      <!-- second blog post  -->
    </article>

    <article>
      <!-- third blog post -->
    </article>
</section>

Simple huh? Be aware though that you can also nest sections inside articles, where it makes sense to do so. For example, if each one of these blog posts has a consistent structure of distinct sections, then you could put sections inside your articles as well. It could look something like this:

<article>
  <section id="introduction">
  </section>

  <section id="content">
  </section>

  <section id="summary">
  </section>
</article>
share|improve this answer
    
Surely you'd use the one-per-document <main> tag instead of <section id="main"? – Dave Everitt Jan 15 at 12:03
1  
I agree, using <main> would be ideal. – Justin Jan 15 at 15:53

The correct method is #2. You used the section tag to define a section of your document. From the specs http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html:

The section element is not a generic container element. When an element is needed for styling purposes or as a convenience for scripting, authors are encouraged to use the div element instead

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not so sure #2 is the best use of this tag (wrapping <article>s), but it's impossible to truly tell with only dummy text as an example, and two sections with the id "primary"... – Wesley Murch Aug 24 '11 at 23:04

My understanding is that SECTION holds a section with a heading which is an important part of the "flow" of the page (not an aside). SECTIONs would be chapters, numbered parts of documents and so on.

ARTICLE is for syndicated content -- e.g. posts, news stories etc. ARTICLE and SECTION are completely separate -- you can have one without the other as they are very different use cases.

Another thing about SECTION is that you shouldn't use it if your page has only the one section. Also, each section must have a heading (H1-6, HGROUP, HEADING). Headings are "scoped" withing the SECTION, so e.g. if you use a H1 in the main page (outside a SECTION) and then a H1 inside the section, the latter will be treated as an H2.

The examples in the spec are pretty good at time of writing.

So in your first example would be correct if you had several sections of content which couldn't be described as ARTICLEs. (With a minor point that you wouldn't need the #primary DIV unless you wanted it for a style hook - P tags would be better).

The second example would be correct if you removed all the SECTION tags -- the data in that document would be articles, posts or something like this.

SECTIONs should not be used as containers -- DIV is still the correct use for that, and any other custom box you might come up with.

share|improve this answer

You can definitely use the section tag as a container. It is there to group content in a more semantically significant way than with a div or as the html5 spec says:

The section element represents a generic section of a document or application. A section, in this context, is a thematic grouping of content, typically with a heading. http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#the-section-element

share|improve this answer

that’s just wrong: is not a wrapper. The element denotes a semantic section of your content to help construct a document outline. It should contain a heading. If you’re looking for a page wrapper element (for any flavour of HTML or XHTML), consider applying styles directly to the element as described by Kroc Camen. If you still need an additional element for styling, use a . As Dr Mike explains, div isn’t dead, and if there’s nothing else more appropriate, it’s probably where you really want to apply your CSS.

you can check this : http://html5doctor.com/avoiding-common-html5-mistakes/

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