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I am doing some simple animation in Javascript. In light of the recent earthquake on the East Coast, I have implemented an earthquake effect whereby a table of information jostles around for a while when you click a button. I want the jostling to start out strong, and then peter out.

I have a utility function that repeatedly calls another function at a set interval. Then it calls a second function when it is all done calling the first function a bunch of times. This is so that you can schedule something to occur when the animation is over. Here is the code for it:

function countIterate(timeout, count, func1, func2)
{
    if (count > 0) {
        func1();
        setTimeout(function() { countIterate(timeout, --count, func1, func2); }, timeout);
    }
    else
        func2();
}

Here is the earthquake routine:

function earthQuake()
{
    console.log("earthQuake()");
    $("table").css("position", "relative");

    var quake = function(magnitude)
    {
        var top = Math.floor(Math.random() * (2 * magnitude + 1)) - magnitude;
        var left = Math.floor(Math.random() * (2 * magnitude + 1)) - magnitude;
        $("table").css("top", top).css("left", left);
    }

    var func = new Array();
    func[0] = function() {};

    for (var i = 1; i <= 4; i++) {
        func[i] = function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); };
        console.log(func[i]);
    }

    func[4]();
}

Unfortunately, I am getting an infinite earthquake loop.

If I hard-code things instead of the for loop:

var func0 = function() {};
var func1 = function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(1); }, func0); };
var func2 = function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(2); }, func1); };
var func3 = function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(3); }, func2); };
var func4 = function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(4); }, func3); };
func4();

it works fine. But this is an ugly solution.

By the way, here is the console.log() output from the first (more elegant, but broken) solution:

function () { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); }
function () { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); }
function () { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); }
function () { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); }

If there is some library that will take care of this sort of thing, please let me know, but I want to get this version working anyway as a learning experience.

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can you show a jsfiddle demo of the ugly solution so we can get an idea of what you are trying to do? – Ibu Aug 25 '11 at 3:07

The function:

function() { countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]); }

is always executed with i = 5 because by the time func[4](); is reached the for loop has already completed. This can be easily shown to be the problem by binding the value of i to the function by returning the function from another:

(function(i) {
    return function() {
        countIterate(35, 40, function() { quake(i); }, func[i-1]);
    };
}(i))

For further explanation, you can refer to answers to the many other "for loop problem" questions that have been asked here, including the top answer for Javascript infamous Loop problem?.

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