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Here is my most simple code:

var this_version =null;

this.timervar = setTimeout(function () {
    try {
        // Firefox 4 and later; Mozilla 2 and later
        Components.utils.import("resource://gre/modules/AddonManager.jsm");
        AddonManager.getAddonByID("parasites@maafire.com", function(addon) {
            this_version = addon.version;
            alert("r "+this_version);
        });
    } catch (ex) {
        // Firefox 3.6 and before; Mozilla 1.9.2 and before
        var em = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/extensions/manager;1"]
            .getService(Components.interfaces.nsIExtensionManager);
        var addon = em.getItemForID("parasites@maafire.com");
        this_version = addon.version;
        alert("rr " + this_version);
    }
    alert("rrr " + this_version);
}, 2000);

and its so damn strange because this fires twice alert("r "+this_version); but this alert("rrr "+this_version); always gives me null ;(

Still learning JS , so this is pretty puzzling... please help!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
No one is going to bother looking at your code when it's formatted like that – qwertymk Aug 25 '11 at 3:30
    
ok, fixed formatting – Ryan Aug 25 '11 at 3:38
    
So what got alerted with the single r? And did the alert with the triple r happen before the alert with the single r? – Ray Toal Aug 25 '11 at 3:53
    
first i get r 0.5 then rrr null then r 0.5 then rrr null – Ryan Aug 25 '11 at 3:59

Here is the right way to do it in the JavaScript world:

function done() {
    alert("rrr "+this_version);
}

var this_version =null;
try {
    // Firefox 4 and later; Mozilla 2 and later
    Components.utils.import("resource://gre/modules/AddonManager.jsm");
    AddonManager.getAddonByID("parasites@maafire.com", function(addon) {
        this_version = addon.version;
        alert("r "+this_version);
        done();
    });
} catch (ex) {
    // Firefox 3.6 and before; Mozilla 1.9.2 and before
    var em = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/extensions/manager;1"]
        .getService(Components.interfaces.nsIExtensionManager);
    var addon = em.getItemForID("parasites@maafire.com");
    this_version = addon.version;
    alert("rr " + this_version);
    done();
}

or even better:

function done(version) {
    alert("rrr "+version);
}

then call it like this:

done(this_version);
share|improve this answer

Your code which sets the this_version variable is inside a callback, so changes to the variable won't be reflected in the scope in which your third alert executes.

share|improve this answer
    
So, how do I get that value into my variable so that I can use it in other places? – Ryan Aug 25 '11 at 3:31
1  
It's not a scope issue but a timing issue. Given that the code is running in a global context, all the functions are accessing the same this_version variable. Even if the outer context is function code, they will have a closure to the same instance since there is no other this_version on their scope chains. The problem is that the function given to setTimeout runs before the other functions have set the value, so at the time that it runs, the functions setting the value haven't been called yet. – RobG Aug 25 '11 at 4:00
1  
@Ryan - presumably Components is making asynchronous AJAX requests (hence the timing issue). You might be able to fix that by making the calls synchronous, but it may not be what you want. – RobG Aug 25 '11 at 4:02
    
Since this runs async I figured it was a timing issue thats why I put it in a settimeout...hopeing that those 2 seconds would be enough for it to get what it needs and update the main variable that I can use elsewhere... but that did not work, how do you suggest I do this then? – Ryan Aug 25 '11 at 4:04
1  
Using setTimeout to call Components will just delay everything. You can try polling using setInterval (ugly as the XHR may never complete successfully and hence not set the variable). You may need a controller function that is told when the XHR calls are made so the controller sets a flag (object property, whatever). Have the callbacks tell it when they are done so it clears the flag. As each returns, the controller checks if any are left to clear. If they're all done, it continues processing. – RobG Aug 25 '11 at 7:13
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Ok, solved it by just moving all the stuff except for the alert out of the timer:

var this_version =null;
try {
    // Firefox 4 and later; Mozilla 2 and later
    Components.utils.import("resource://gre/modules/AddonManager.jsm");
    AddonManager.getAddonByID("parasites@maafire.com", function(addon) {
        this_version = addon.version;
        alert("r "+this_version);
    });
} catch (ex) {
    // Firefox 3.6 and before; Mozilla 1.9.2 and before
    var em = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/extensions/manager;1"]
        .getService(Components.interfaces.nsIExtensionManager);
    var addon = em.getItemForID("parasites@maafire.com");
    this_version = addon.version;
    alert("rr " + this_version);
}

this.timervar = setTimeout(function ()
                            { 



                                    alert("rrr "+this_version);


                            }, 2000);
share|improve this answer
    
This is not a reliable solution. Waiting for 2 seconds doesn't guarantee that this_version is already set. – Mouad Debbar Jul 14 '13 at 5:37

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