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What is the best way to determine a factor or create a new category field based on a number of boolean fields? In this example, I need to count the number of unique combinations of medications.

   > MultPsychMeds
       ID OLANZAPINE HALOPERIDOL QUETIAPINE RISPERIDONE
    1   A          1           1          0           0
    2   B          1           0          1           0
    3   C          1           0          1           0
    4   D          1           0          1           0
    5   E          1           0          0           1
    6   F          1           0          0           1
    7   G          1           0          0           1
    8   H          1           0          0           1
    9   I          0           1          1           0
    10  J          0           1          1           0

Perhaps another way to state it is that I need to pivot or cross tabulate the pairs. The final results need to look something like:

Combination            Count
OLANZAPINE/HALOPERIDOL     1
OLANZAPINE/QUETIAPINE      3
OLANZAPINE/RISPERIDONE     4
HALOPERIDOL/QUETIAPINE     2

This data frame can be replicated in R with:

MultPsychMeds <- structure(list(ID = structure(1:10, .Label = c("A", "B", "C", 
"D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J"), class = "factor"), OLANZAPINE = c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L), HALOPERIDOL = c(1L, 0L, 
0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L), QUETIAPINE = c(0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L), RISPERIDONE = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L)), .Names = c("ID", "OLANZAPINE", "HALOPERIDOL", 
"QUETIAPINE", "RISPERIDONE"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-10L))
share|improve this question
2  
+1 for providing the data. However, I believe you need to update your title, as there appear to be no booleans (logicals) involved, nor is there any 'conversion' going on. Can you revise it to something like 'count the number of co-occurrences' or similar? –  Nick Sabbe Aug 25 '11 at 7:18
    
Thanks. Revised the title to match the actual question. Regarding Boolean, the raw data includes 0 for FALSE and 1 for TRUE and R is setting those variables to Integers when loading from .csv files. Would this process be better if these were converted to logical variables first? –  Rollie Aug 25 '11 at 13:28
1  
I think the reference to boolean is fine and intuitive, R equates 1 & TRUE to be one and the same as far as I know (there may be instances where this is not true). For example, > 1 == TRUE [1] TRUE –  Chase Aug 25 '11 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's one approach using the reshape and plyr packages:

library(reshape)
library(plyr)

#Melt into long format
dat.m <- melt(MultPsychMeds, id.vars = "ID")
#Group at the ID level and paste the drugs together with "/"
out <- ddply(dat.m, "ID", summarize, combos = paste(variable[value == 1], collapse = "/"))

#Calculate a table
with(out, count(combos))

                       x freq
1 HALOPERIDOL/QUETIAPINE    2
2 OLANZAPINE/HALOPERIDOL    1
3  OLANZAPINE/QUETIAPINE    3
4 OLANZAPINE/RISPERIDONE    4
share|improve this answer
    
This is very helpful and just what I was looking for. Thank you –  Rollie Aug 26 '11 at 13:14

Just for fun, a base R solution (that can be turned into a oneliner :-) ):

data.frame(table(apply(MultPsychMeds[,-1], 1, function(currow){
    wc<-which(currow==1)
    paste(colnames(MultPsychMeds)[wc+1], collapse="/")
})))
share|improve this answer

Another way could be:

subset(
    as.data.frame(
        with(MultPsychMeds, table(OLANZAPINE, HALOPERIDOL, QUETIAPINE, RISPERIDONE)),
        responseName="count"
    ),
    count>0
)

which gives

   OLANZAPINE HALOPERIDOL QUETIAPINE RISPERIDONE count
4           1           1          0           0     1
6           1           0          1           0     3
7           0           1          1           0     2
10          1           0          0           1     4

It's not an exact way you want it, but is fast and simple.


There is shorthand in plyr package:

require(plyr)
count(MultPsychMeds, c("OLANZAPINE", "HALOPERIDOL", "QUETIAPINE", "RISPERIDONE"))
#   OLANZAPINE HALOPERIDOL QUETIAPINE RISPERIDONE freq
# 1          0           1          1           0    2
# 2          1           0          0           1    4
# 3          1           0          1           0    3
# 4          1           1          0           0    1
share|improve this answer

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