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I have a large data set with 11 columns and 100000 rows (for example) in which i have values 1,2,3,4. Where 4 is a missing value. Some of the rows are completely missing. i.e. 4 in all 11 columns. For example

"4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"  "4"   "4"

Now what i need is to remove only those rows which are completely missing. In simple words, i want to keep rows with missing value less than 11. I have used na.omit, but it does not work in my case.

Thanks in advance.

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How one does this will likely depend on information that you haven't provided. Is this a data frame or a matrix? Are the values stored as integers or characters? Try editing your question with the output from running str(head(foo)) where foo is your data. –  joran Aug 25 '11 at 4:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A real speedy way would be to use a little bit of math. Assuming your dataframe is called datf

rsum <- rowSums(datf)
datf <- datf[rowSums != 44,] #11 * 4

(works for a matrix too)

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1  
I won't give you a minus 1, but this kind of approach is very dangerous. It works for this specific case, but what happens if you add/delete a column? Always try and solve problems in robust ways. –  Andrie Aug 25 '11 at 8:24
    
This won't work because a row can sum to 44 without all elements being 4 (e.g. c(4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,3,5)). –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 25 '11 at 11:53
    
note question... values can only be 1, 2, 3, or 4 in this dataset. –  John Aug 25 '11 at 15:09
    
and, yes, it's not robust but if the author wanted fast sometimes you make a very targeted function for speed... sometimes you have trade off against robustness. (I think it's good that it's lack of robustness was pointed out... now how about cheers for it being really really fast and solving the problem?) –  John Aug 25 '11 at 15:10
    
@John: I agree that sometimes you may want to trade off robustness for speed, but this isn't one of those times because you can have both (see my answer). –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 25 '11 at 17:31

Perhaps your best option is to utilise R's idiom for working with missing, or NA values. Once you have coded NA values you can work with complete.cases to easily achieve your objective.

Create some sample data with missing values (i.e. with value 4):

set.seed(123)
m <- matrix(sample(1:4, 30, prob=c(0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 0.1), replace=TRUE), ncol=6)
m[4, ] <- rep(4, 6)

Replace all values equal to 4 with NA:

m[m==4] <- NA
m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    1   NA    2    2    2
[2,]    2    3    3    1    2    3
[3,]    3    2    2    1    2    3
[4,]   NA   NA   NA   NA   NA   NA
[5,]   NA    3    1   NA    2    1

Now you can use a variety of functions that deal with NA values. For example, complete.cases will return only, you guessed it, complete cases:

m[complete.cases(m), ]

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    2    3    3    1    2    3
[2,]    3    2    2    1    2    3

For more information, see ?complete.cases or ?na.fail in the stats package.

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This is the fastest solution I can think of. I'll use example data similar to @Andrie.

set.seed(21)
m <- matrix(sample(1:6, 110, replace=TRUE), ncol=11)
missVal <- 4
m[4, ] <- rep(missVal, 11)
m <- m[ rowSums((m==missVal)) != NCOL(m), ]

The last line works because m==missVal returns a matrix of logical (TRUE/FALSE) values. rowSums converts TRUE to 1 and FALSE to 0, so in this case we know all the columns are 4 whenever rowSums returns 11.

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Something like this should do the trick (and should work for both matrices and data.frames):

ac<-matrix(c("4","4","4","4","4","4","4","3","3","4","4", rep("4", 11)), nrow=2, ncol=11, byrow=TRUE)

rowsToRemove<-which(apply(ac, 1, function(currow){
    all(currow=="4")
}))

Now you can simply do

newac<-ac[-rowsToRemove,]
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I found this solution elsewhere and am pasting it here using Andrie's code to generate the initial data set.

First generate the data set:

set.seed(123)
m <- matrix(sample(1:4, 30, prob=c(0.3, 0.3, 0.3, 0.1), replace=TRUE), ncol=6)
m[4, ] <- rep(4, 6)
m[m==4] <- NA
m

Here is the intial data set:

1    1    NA   2    2    2
2    3    3    1    2    3
3    2    2    1    2    3
NA   NA   NA   NA   NA   NA
NA   3    1    NA   2    1

Now remove rows that only contain missing observations:

m[rowSums(is.na(m))<ncol(m),] 

Here is the result:

1    1    NA   2    2    2
2    3    3    1    2    3
3    2    2    1    2    3
NA   3    1    NA   2    1
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Using data.table for memory efficiency. The solution creating is.na(x) is creating a data set as large as the original, and thus is inefficient.

library(data.table)
DT <- as.data.table(m)
missing_value <- 4
missing <- as.data.table(setNames(as.list(rep(4, length(DT)), names(DT))
setkeyv(DT, names(DT))
setkey(missing, names(DT))

DT[-DT[(missing),which=T]]

both this and @JoshuaUlrich's solution are fast for large data

set.seed(21)
m <- matrix(sample(1:6, 1100000, replace=TRUE), ncol=11)
missVal <- 4
missing_rows <- sample(100000, 53)
m[missing_rows, ] <- rep(missVal, 11)

DT <- as.data.table(m)
setkeyv(DT, names(DT))
missing <- setNames(as.list(rep(missVal, 11)), names(DT))

system.time({DT1 <- DT[-DT[missing,which=T]]})
## user  system elapsed 
## 0.02    0.00    0.01 
system.time({m1 <- m[ rowSums((m==missVal)) != NCOL(m), ]})
## user  system elapsed 
## 0.02    0.02    0.03 
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1  
Be careful using T/F instead of TRUE/FALSE, since T and F can be re-defined. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 3 '12 at 10:23

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