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As the question, these span elements display with two style in browser, why?

<html>
  <head>
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    function loadHTML() {
      var html = '<span class="edited-box">sfds</span><span class="added-box">sfds</span>';
      document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = html;
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div style="background-color:#ccc;" onclick="loadHTML();">click to add span</div>
    <div id="content"></div>
    <div>
      <span class="edited-box">sfds</span>
      <span class="added-box">sfds</span>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
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What is the difference showing between the two? –  mwan Aug 25 '11 at 4:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because there's whitespace between the two HTML span elements. If you wrote it, for instance, like this, you'd see:

<html>
  <head>
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    function loadHTML() {
      var html = '<div><span class="edited-box">sfds</span><span class="added-box">sfds</span></div>';
      document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = html;
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div style="background-color:#ccc;" onclick="loadHTML();">click to add span</div>
    <div id="content"></div>
    <div>
      <span class="edited-box">sfds</span><span class="added-box">sfds</span>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

<span> is an inline element – That is, it has no space above, below, or to the sides. To have space, add &nbsp; between to the spans in the Javascript as such:

      var html = '<div><span class="edited-box">sfds</span>&nbsp;<span class="added-box">sfds</span></div>';
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I got it.inline element is the point, it's necessary to anderstand it in depth. Thanks! –  leotso Aug 25 '11 at 5:31

Look at the Non-Breaking Space section here: http://www.w3schools.com/HTML/html_entities.asp

"Browsers will always truncate spaces in HTML pages. If you write 10 spaces in 
your text, the browser will remove 9 of them, before displaying the page. To add 
spaces to your text, you "can use the &nbsp; character entity.

As it says, any amount of white space between two span elements (or any other inline elements) will be rendered as a single space. So the line break between


<span>sfds</span>
<span>sfds</span>

will be rendered as


<span>sfds</span> <span>sfds</span>

(The line break is truncated to a single space.)

In your example, notice that in the html that is added to the DOM via JavaScript, there are no spaces between the span elements, so it is rendered differently.

If you need the two to match, you can either a) modify your HTML to match the HTML that you are injecting into the DOM in the JS or b) use a non-breaking space between the two spans you are injecting into the DOM in the JS.

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