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I have a quick OOP question and would like to see how others would approach this particular situation. Here it goes:

Class A (base class) -> Class B (extends Class A) Class C (base class) -> Class D (extends Class C)

Simple so far right? Now, Class A can receive an instance of Class C through its constructor. Likewise, Class B can receive an instance of either class C or Class D through its constructor. Here is a quick snippet of code:

Class A
{
    protected var _data:C;
    public function A( data:C )
    {
        _data = data;
    }
}

Class B extends A
{
    public function B( data:D )
    {
        super( data );
    }
}

Class C
{
    public var someVar:String; // Using public for example so I don't need to write an mutator or accessor
    public function C() { } // empty constructor for example
}

Class D extends C
{
    public var someVar2:String; // Using public for example so I don't need to write an mutator or accessor
    public function D() { super(); } // empty constructor for example
}

So, let's say that I am using class B. Since _data was defined as a protected var in Class A as type C, I will need to typecast my _data variable to type D in class B every time I want to use it. I would really like to avoid this if possible. I'm sure there is a pattern for this, but don't know what it is. For now, i'm solving the problem by doing the following:

Class B extends A
{
    private var _data2:D;
    public function B( data:D )
    {
        super( data );
        _data2 = data;
    }
}

Now, in class B, I can use _data2 instead of typecasting _data to type D every-time I want to use it. I think there might be a cleaner solution that others have used. Thoughts?

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I believe what you want to do here is extract an interface from type D that includes the functionality that you want to access. Then mark type C as implementing this interface. Then you change the declaration in A to be of your interface type, instead of type C. The exact way to do this will depend upon the language you are using. Note that this may also require you to add methods to type C, or alternately declare type C as abstract. –  aroth Aug 25 '11 at 5:07

2 Answers 2

I think B doesn't take C or D... in order for it to do what you wrote it should be

public function B( data:C )
{
    super( data );
}

At least as far as I used to know :) I doubt you can use a downwards inheritance in your case.

As for the pattern, the best one to use in situations like these is Polymorphism. Alternatively, depending on language, you can use interfaces. Or if languages allow it, even a combination of conventional code and templates.

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Most modern OO languages support covariant of return type, that is: an overriding method can have a return type that is a subclass of the return type in the original (overridden) method.

Thus, the trick is to define a getter method in A that will return C, and then have B override it, such that it returns D. For this to work the variable _data is immutable: it is initialized at construction time, and from that point it does not change its value.

Class A {
  private var _data:C;
  public function A(data:C) {
    _data = data;
  }

  public function getData() : C {
    return _data;
  }

  // No function that takes a C value and assigns it to _data!      
}

Class B extends A  {
  public function B(data:D) {
    super(data);
  }  

  public function getData() : D { // Override and change return type
    return (D) super.getData();   // Downcast only once.
  }
}

This how I usually write it in Java:

public class A {
  private final C data;

  public A(C data) { this.data = data; }
  public C getData() { return data; }
}

public class B extends A {
  public B(D data) { super(data); }
  @Override
  public D getData() { return (D) super.getData(); }
}
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