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So everybody knows that I can get a list of numbers with range like so:

>>> range(5)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

And if I want, say, 3 copies of each number I could use:

>>> range(5)*3
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

But suppose I wanted them like this instead?

[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]

Is there a quick and elegant built-in way to get that?

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1  
Note: By elegant I mean I'm not really interested in solutions involving sorting or converting to arrays and back. –  wim Aug 25 '11 at 5:23
    
The best I could get was the somewhat silly [x/3 for x in range(3*5)] –  wim Aug 25 '11 at 5:25
2  
Even though you say you don't want it, sorted(range(5)*3) looks pretty elegant to me ;) –  Habbie Aug 25 '11 at 5:27
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8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can do:

>>> [i for i in range(5) for _ in range(3)]
[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]

the range(3) part should be replaced with your number of repetitions...

BTW, you should use generators


Just to make it clearer, the _ is a variable name for something you don't care about (any name is allowed).

This list comprehension uses nested for loops and are just like that:

for i in range(5):
    for j in range(3):
        #your code here
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I like it! If you can explain how this mysterious list trick works, I would accept this answer. I have used _ in interactive python to refer to the previous output, is it related to that at all? –  wim Aug 25 '11 at 5:59
    
p.s. I'm aware it can be done with generators (hence the tag), but I wanted a one liner. –  wim Aug 25 '11 at 6:01
    
the _ is used in code to show you don't care about what the variable will hold. I only want to loop 3 times but don't care about the index... it's a convention, thought –  JBernardo Aug 25 '11 at 6:02
3  
the generator i'm talking about is: (i for i in xrange(5) for j in xrange(3)) –  JBernardo Aug 25 '11 at 6:04
    
OK, I see.. not sure I like that convention about _ because in a line like x = [0 for _ in range(5)] the list comprehension variable will "leak" into the namespace in an interactive session and stomp on the usage of that symbol for last output. It also gave me a WTF moment when I first read your answer! –  wim Aug 25 '11 at 6:24
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Try this:

itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.repeat(x, 3) for x in range(5))
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from itertools import chain, izip
list(chain(*izip(*[xrange(5)]*3)))

Gives

[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]

Leave off the list and you have a generator.

EDIT: or even better (leaves out a function call to izip):

list(chain(*([x]*3 for x in xrange(5))))
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>>> from itertools import chain, izip, tee
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(izip(*tee(range(5), 3))))
[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]
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A cool iterator using another approach:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> Counter(range(5) * 3).elements()
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import itertools
[x for tupl in itertools.izip(*itertools.tee(range(0,5),3)) for x in tupl]

Or:

[x for tupl in zip(range(0,5), range(0,5), range(0,5)) for x in tupl]
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Are you freaking serious? I lol'd –  user780363 Aug 25 '11 at 5:45
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I like to Keep It Simple :)

>>> sorted(list(range(5)) * 3)
[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]
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Oh, somebody already mentioned that... –  promanow Aug 25 '11 at 5:59
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Another way

from itertools import repeat
[[elem for elem in [i for i in repeat(lists, lim)]] for lists in range(lim)]

This actually makes them separate lists, which I think is more useful.

You don't need to make it a generator if you don't need it to be lazy, but you can if you want it.

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