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I am trying to accomplish the following scenario that the generic TestClassWrapper will be able to access static properties of classes it is made of (they will all derive from TestClass). Something like:

public class TestClass
{
    public static int x = 5;
}

public class TestClassWrapper<T> where T : TestClass
{
    public int test()
    {
        return T.x;
    }
}

Gives the error: 'T' is a 'type parameter', which is not valid in the given context.

Any suggestions?

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I'm not sure using static methods this way is supported. –  Matthew Abbott Aug 25 '11 at 7:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can't, basically, at least not without reflection.

One option is to put a delegate in your constructor so that whoever creates an instance can specify how to get at it:

var wrapper = new TestClassWrapper<TestClass>(() => TestClass.x);

You could do it with reflection if necessary:

public class TestClassWrapper<T> where T : TestClass
{
    private static readonly FieldInfo field = typeof(T).GetField("x");

    public int test()
    {
        return (int) field.GetValue(null);
    }
}

(Add appropriate binding flags if necessary.)

This isn't great, but at least you only need to look up the field once...

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Good alternative ideas... –  gw0 Aug 25 '11 at 7:28

Surely you can just write this:

public int test() 
{ 
    return TestClass.x; 
} 

Even in a nontrivial example, you can't override a static field so will always call it from your known base class.

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1  
This is pretty annoying that you can not have a virtual static field that can be overridden. My previous attempt was to use a static filed and static methods that use it and then I tried to derive from it and override the static field with other values, but it did't work. –  gw0 Aug 25 '11 at 7:34
    
@gw0 agreed that it's annoying, but I find the inability to do T.StaticMethod() less surprising seeing this answer; I don't find the inability to override static members surprising to begin with; I never considered polymorphism sans instances –  nik.shornikov Oct 10 '13 at 23:15
    
@gw0 I know this is super old and you probably know this by now, but you can simulate overriding static properties by making them private fields and then accessing them through virtual properties that are not static. If the virtual property is accessing a static property then it is in effect static. –  BVernon Jan 14 at 16:06

Why not just return TestClass.x?

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In this situation you assume that T is a subclass of TestClass. Subclasses of TestClass will not have the static int x.

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Generics do not support anything related to static members, so that won't work. My advice would be: don't make it static. Assuming the field genuinely relates to the specific T, you could also use reflection:

return (int) typeof(T).GetField("x").GetValue(null);

but I don't recommend it.

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