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Is the following use of 'dynamic', in the method IsUnixNewline, good or bad?

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        byte[] bytes = { 32, 32, 32, 10 };
        string text  = "hello\n";

        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; ++i) {
            if (IsUnixNewline(bytes, i)) {
                Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'bytes'.");
                break;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; ++i) {
            if (IsUnixNewline(text, i)) {
                Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'text'.");
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    static bool IsUnixNewline(dynamic array, int index)
    {
        return array[index] == '\n' && (index == 0 || array[index - 1] != '\r');
    }
}
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3  
Why dynamic and not char or string in this case? –  Roger Alsing Aug 25 '11 at 7:58
1  
I don't see how IsUnixNewline could use char or string. –  Tom Aug 25 '11 at 8:00
    
@Roger byte array and string is passed to method. look again. –  Reniuz Aug 25 '11 at 8:02
    
I wonder if you could use a Linq (i.e., Enumerable.Cast ) to make your byte array into a char array, thus sidestepping the whole problem. –  Brian Aug 26 '11 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I would say "yes" - dynamic is not required here, and adds a lot of uncertainty about what it will do at runtime (and, of course, throws away static compiler checking); better to just use a few overloads in this case, IMO:

    static bool IsUnixNewline(char[] array, int index)
    {
        return array[index] == '\n' && (index == 0 || array[index - 1] != '\r');
    }
    static bool IsUnixNewline(byte[] array, int index)
    {
        return array[index] == '\n' && (index == 0 || array[index - 1] != '\r');
    }
    static bool IsUnixNewline(string array, int index)
    {
        return array[index] == '\n' && (index == 0 || array[index - 1] != '\r');
    }
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rewritten (without a compiler!) to make use of char[] instead of dynamic. You need to take care of the correct encoding, when converting byte[] to string, but you should get the idea.

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        byte[] bytes = { 32, 32, 32, 10 };
        string text  = "hello\n";
        char[] characterArray = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(bytes).ToCharArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < characterArray.Length; ++i) {
            if (IsUnixNewline(characterArray, i)) {
                Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'bytes'.");
                break;
            }
        }

        characterArray = text.ToCharArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < characterArray .Length; ++i) {
            if (IsUnixNewline(characterArray, i)) {
                Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'text'.");
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    static bool IsUnixNewline(char[] array, int index)
    {
        return array[index] == '\n' && (index == 0 || array[index - 1] != '\r');
    }
}
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In my opinion bad, as this

        var b = IsUnixNewline(new NewObjectNotSupportingIndexer(), 0);

will go through the compiler perfectly fine during development, but fail during runtime. Why sacrificing type safety when you don´t have too? Dynamic is of great help if you don´t know the type during developemt (ComInterop), but in this case I think it causes more damage than help.

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Hmm, how else could IsUnixNewline be written? I can't find an interface like IIndexable. –  Tom Aug 25 '11 at 8:07

the dynamic keyword causes runtime type checking instead of compiletime type checking. I cannot for the life of me see why this simple operation explicitly requires runtime type checking. the same could very easily be achieved without dynamic. I don't know if I'd classify this as an abuse of dynamic, I'd certainly classify it as unnecessary.

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1  
How could the code be written without 'dynamic'? –  Tom Aug 25 '11 at 8:10

First it's important to recognize that a byte is not a character. Therefore, to convert those you need to first apply an encoding (even if that's only the ASCII or Default encoding). Doing that with the GetString method of Encoding will give you a string, making the distinction between the two types void.

However, to answer more generally, you should always try and see what the types have in common. For instance, both the char[] and string implement IEnumerable<char>. Therefore, instead of checking each position for being a unit newline, why not have a method which checks all characters using an enumerator?

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Program {
    static void Main() {
        byte[] bytes = { 32, 32, 32, 10 };
        string text  = "hello\n";

        if (HasUnixNewline(Encoding.ASCII.GetChars(bytes))) {
            Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'bytes'.");
        }
        if (HasUnixNewline(text)) {
            Console.WriteLine("Found Unix newline in 'text'.");
        }
   }

    static bool HasUnixNewline(IEnumerable<char> chars) {
        bool prevIsCR = false;
        foreach (char ch in chars) {
            if ((ch == '\n') && (!prevIsCR)) {
                return true;
            }
            prevIsCR = ch == '\r';
        }
        return false;
    }
}

The other variant would be to use the so-called Adapter Pattern, that is, an (often stateless) object wrapping the original instance and providing alternative interfaces. In this case, you could easily implement an interface which exposes just the read indexer and returns characters, and then use this in your IsUnixNewLine method. Or you could apply that same pattern to avoid the use of the Encoding class in my sample by writing an adapter which implements IEnumerable<char> and wraps an IEnumerable<byte>.

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