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I just came accross this table:

Alternatives to SPList.Items

Please let me know what difference in poor-->better for the last 5 items.

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Sorry if it is a language problem but you are going to have to explain your question better it makes almost no sense at the moment. –  Ben Robinson Aug 25 '11 at 9:03
    
Hai marek...sorry if i m not clear....msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/… Please find this link....you can find the table with differece b/w poor and better performance.....i would like to know what are last 5 differences... –  Govind Aug 25 '11 at 9:08
3  
The explanation is in the original article, right above the table: Accessing the methods and properties that are listed in the left column of the following table will enumerate the entire SPList.Items collection, and cause poor performance and throttling for large lists. Instead, use the alternatives listed in the right column. –  Marek Grzenkowicz Aug 25 '11 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

he reason for all of this is quite simple. When you write SPList.Items.Count to get the total number of items, SPList.Items returns the collection of all items in the list. You don't want the all items, this can be an expensive action. By writing SPList.ItemCount, you make sure you only read a number from the database, and not all items.

Essentially, this is true for all items in the list - you should generally avoid using the entire Collection objects (i.e. SPList.Items or SPFolder.Files) when you can. Similarly, if you use them more than once, you should cache them using a local variable.

Here's an example using indexers. Suppose I have a Guid, and want to get an item.

SPListItem item = list.Items[guid];

Looks innocent enough, but it is actually the same as:

SPListItemCollection items = list.Items; SPListItem item = items[guid];

The point is - SharePoint (and C#, really) doesn't know what you're going to do next, or how you're going to use the collection. The moment you've wrote .Items you already made a slow operation.

share|improve this answer

The reason for all of this is quite simple. When you write SPList.Items.Count to get the total number of items, SPList.Items returns the collection of all items in the list.
You don't want the all items, this can be an expensive action.
By writing SPList.ItemCount, you make sure you only read a number from the database, and not all items.

Essentially, this is true for all items in the list - you should generally avoid using the entire Collection objects (i.e. SPList.Items or SPFolder.Files) when you can. Similarly, if you use them more than once, you should cache them using a local variable.

Here's an example using indexers. Suppose I have a Guid, and want to get an item.

SPListItem item = list.Items[guid];

Looks innocent enough, but it is actually the same as:

SPListItemCollection items = list.Items;
SPListItem item = items[guid];

The point is - SharePoint (and C#, really) doesn't know what you're going to do next, or how you're going to use the collection. The moment you've wrote .Items you already made a slow operation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply kobi, so this will apply for SPList.Items[System.Guid] ,SPList.Items[System.Int32],SPList.Items.GetItemById(System.Int32) also?? What about the last one....? –  Govind Aug 25 '11 at 9:11
    
@Govind - Yes! SPList.Items[System.Guid] first gets the entire collection - SPList.Items, and then runs the indexer on it: [System.Int32]. –  Kobi Aug 25 '11 at 9:14
    
Thanks Kobi..... –  Govind Aug 25 '11 at 9:16
    
@Govind - see the update. Oh, and thanks! There's also this article: blog.dynatrace.com/2009/01/11/… It's interesting, but also looks like he's selling a product. –  Kobi Aug 25 '11 at 9:17

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