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Why default constructor is required(explicitly) in a parent class if it has an argumented constructor

class A {    
  A(int i){    
  }
}

class B extends A {
}

class Main {    
  public static void main(String a[]){
    B b_obj = new B();
  }
}

This will be an error.

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8 Answers 8

(Like Michael, I assume that you meant to make B extend A.)

There are two aspects at work here:

  • If you do specify a constructor explicitly (as in A) the Java compiler will not create a parameterless constructor for you.

  • If you don't specify a constructor explicitly (as in B) the Java compiler will create a parameterless constructor for you like this:

    B()
    {
        super();
    }
    

(The accessibility depends on the accessibility of the class itself.)

That's trying to call the superclass parameterless constructor - so it has to exist. You have two options:

  • Provide a parameterless constructor explicitly in A
  • Provide a parameterless constructor explicitly in B which explicitly calls the base class constructor with an appropriate int argument.
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I think you misread :) –  AVD Aug 25 '11 at 9:16
    
The question is in Java ;). –  nidhin Aug 25 '11 at 9:17
    
@nidhin: True - although the answer is exactly the same :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 25 '11 at 9:18
1  
@adatapost: I didn't notice that it was for Java instead of C#, but the situation is the same in both languages. I've edited my answer now. –  Jon Skeet Aug 25 '11 at 9:19
    
+1 I Agree! Jon. –  AVD Aug 25 '11 at 9:21

Assuming that you meant to write class B extends A:

Every constructor has to call a superclass constructor; if it does not the parameterless superclass constructor is called implicitly.

If (and only if) a class declares no constructor, the Java compiler gives it a default constructor which takes no parameters and calls the parameterless constructor of the superclass. In your example, A declares a constructor and therefor does not have such a default constructor. Class B does not declare a constructor, but cannot get a default constructor because its superclass does not have a parameterless constructor to call. Since a class must always have a constructor, this is a compiler error.

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its a compiler error my doubt is ...why parent class should have a default constructor explicitly...while it has an argumented constructor –  user358099 Aug 25 '11 at 9:20
1  
@user358099: Because the implicit default constructor is only created if there is not ecplicit constructor. And that's because a programmer may not want his class to have a parameterless constructor, so it would be very bad language design to always implicitly create one. –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 25 '11 at 9:28

Why default constructor is required(explicitly) in a parent class if it has an argumented constructor

I would say this statement is not always correct. As ideally its not required.

The Rule is : If you are explicitly providing an argument-ed constructer, then the default constructor (non-argumented) is not available to the class.

For Example :   
class A {    
  A(int i){    
  }
}

class B extends A {
}

So when you write

B obj_b = new B();

It actually calls the implicit constructor provided by java to B, which again calls the super(), which should be ideally A(). But since you have provided argument-ed constructor to A, the default constructor i:e A() is not available to B().

That's the reason you need A() to be specifically declared for B() to call super().

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Say this compiled, what would you expect it to print?

class A{
  A(int i){
    System.out.println("A.i= "+i);
  }
}

class B extends A {
  public static void main(String... args) {
    new B();
  }
}

When A is constructed a value for i has to be passed, however the compiler doesn't know what it should be so you have specify it explicitly in a constructor (any constructor, it doesn't have to be a default one)

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Why default constructor is required(explicitly) in a parent class if it 
has an argumented constructor

Not necessarily!

Now in your class B

class B extends A {
}

you have not provided any constructor in Class B so a default constructor will be placed. Now it is a rule that each constructor must call one of it's super class constructor. In your case the default constructor in Class B will try to call default constructor in class A(it's parent) but as you don't have a default constructor in Class A(as you have explicitly provided a constructor with arguments in class A you will not have a default constructor in Class A ) you will get an error.

What you could possibly do is

Either provide no args constructor in Class A.

A()
{
  //no arg default constructor in Class A
}

OR

Explicitly write no args constructor in B and call your super with some default int argument.

B()
{
    super(defaultIntValue);
}

Bottom line is that for an object to be created completely constructors of each parent in the inheritance hierarchy must be called. Which ones to call is really your design choice. But in case you don't explicitly provide any java will put default constructor super() call as 1st line of each of your sub class constructors and now if you don't have that in superclass then you will get an error.

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Of course its an error if written like this it's not JAVA.

If you would have use JAVA syntax it wouldn't be an error.

Class A and B knows nothing about each other if in separate files/packages.

Class A doesn't need a default constructor at all it works fine with only a parameter constructor.

If B extends A you simple use a call to super(int a) in B's constructor and everything is fine. for constructors not calling a super(empty/or not) extending a super class the compiler will add a call to super().

For further reading look at Using the Keyword super

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really a valuable answer. But a small clarification why super() is added implicitly by compiler. –  user358099 Aug 25 '11 at 9:40
    
@user358099 I have added a new answer to your edited question. –  Farmor Aug 25 '11 at 9:59

I would guess that its because when you have an empty parameter list the super variable can't be instantiated. With empty parameter list I mean the implicit super() the compiler could add if the super class had a nonparametric constructor.

For example if you type:

int a;
System.out.print(a);

You will get an error with what I think is the same logic error.

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When we have parameter constructor. we explicit bound to consumer by design. he can not create object of that class without parameter. some time we need to force user to provide value. object should be created only by providing parameter(default value).

class Asset
{
    private int id;
    public Asset(int id)
    {
        this.id = id;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        /* Gives Error - User can not create object. 
         * Design bound
         */
        Asset asset1 = new Asset();/* Error */
    }
}

Even child class can not create. hence it is behavior of good design.

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