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I'm just starting to teach myself Haskell out of the book "Learn you a haskell for great good", and I rewote the quicksort in Chapter 5 using where:

quicksort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
quicksort [] = []
quicksort (x:xs) = smaller ++ [x] ++ bigger
    where smaller = quicksort [a | a <- xs, a <= x]
      bigger = quicksort [a |a <- xs, a > x]

but when I loaded it into GHCi 7.0.3, I got the following error:

parse error on input '='

The original code on the book:

quicksort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]  
quicksort [] = []  
quicksort (x:xs) =   
    let smallerSorted = quicksort [a | a <- xs, a <= x]  
        biggerSorted = quicksort [a | a <- xs, a > x]  
    in  smallerSorted ++ [x] ++ biggerSorted

Can you please help me find it why it doesn't work with where?

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With your edit you have fixed the indentation and so you should no longer get the parse error, so the question becomes unintelligible...? –  Francesco Aug 25 '11 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

That's the whitespace rule. Your definitions after where have to be at the same whitespace indentation. This will compile:

quicksort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
quicksort [] = []
quicksort (x:xs) = smaller ++ [x] ++ bigger
    where smaller = quicksort [a | a <- xs, a <= x]
          bigger = quicksort [a |a <- xs, a > x]

You may want to read this.

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2  
As a rule of thumb, always align your lines to the same indentation, if they form a logical unit. –  FUZxxl Aug 25 '11 at 9:26
    
It's really caused by the whitespce rule. –  Porco Aug 25 '11 at 9:36
7  
A pedant writes... it's inappropriate to call this the "whitespace" rule, as the correct level of indentation is not always (and indeed not here) determined by whitespace alone. It's the "layout" rule. The relevant indentation level is determined by the first token after the layout keyword. In this case, the keyword is where, so the given definitions must align with the start of smaller, whose indentation level includes the width of the non-whitespace where. Layout is about more than whitespace, is not invariant under alpha-conversion, and needs a fixed-pitch font! –  pigworker Aug 25 '11 at 9:52
    
@pigworker: I prefer to think of it as "the ASCII-art rule", because it involves arranging code to suggest a two-dimensional structure that doesn't really exist in raw text files. –  C. A. McCann Aug 25 '11 at 14:01
1  
Everyone is wrong. It is really the offsides rule. –  alternative Aug 26 '11 at 0:19

As an addendum to cldy's answer, note that you can also format where-clauses like this:

quicksort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
quicksort [] = []
quicksort (x:xs) = smaller ++ [x] ++ bigger where
    smaller = quicksort [a | a <- xs, a <= x]
    bigger = quicksort [a |a <- xs, a > x]

I personally prefer this as it conserves some horizontal space, and because most editors can't intelligently auto-indent to the correct column when using the more traditional style.

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Further to my earlier remark, keeping layout keywords at the end of line (so the block indentation is given by the amount of whitespace on the next line) is invariant under alpha-conversion and does not need a fixed-pitch font, as well displaying admirable horizontal thrift. This is my preferred style for where and of, but it seems less suited to let. –  pigworker Aug 25 '11 at 11:40

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