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I'm currently in a bit of a dilemma regarding PDO. I've recently switched to using it from my own custom database class as I want to take advantage of transactions. The problem I'm facing is how to throw exceptions from inside a block of code that is already wrapped with try/catch for PDO. Here is an example...

try {
    // PDO code

    // Transaction start

    // Throw manual exception here if error occurs (transaction rollback too)

   // Transaction commit

} catch (PDOException $e) {
    // Transaction rollback
    // Code to handle the exception
}

Taking the above code example and bearing in mind that the PHP manual says; "You should not throw a PDOException from your own code". How would I handle my own exceptions and the PDO ones? Some kind of nesting?

share|improve this question
    
You can catch all exceptions by using Exception container. However, why would you want to nest exceptions in the first place? I've never, ever had the need for that when using PDO and transactions. Stick the code for performing transactions in try / catch and execute it, do the other error checking before initiating transactions and doing INSERTS, DELETES and UPDATES. –  N.B. Aug 25 '11 at 9:45
    
Perhaps I'm going about the error checking in the wrong way. The transactions are quite long and if any step fails - this includes values not being what they should be - then I need to terminate the execution and roll back. The catch block then includes a function the mail me about the error. On these errors I would want to throw a normal exception and not a PDO one. –  Crispy Beef Aug 25 '11 at 10:23
    
If any of the operations in the transaction fails, PDOException is raised. I can see in your commented code that you have rollback there in the catch block. What's wrong with using mail function right there so you can mail yourself what and where caused the error? It's not like throwing another exception can give you more meaningful results than errors MySQL complains about, which are held in PDOException. –  N.B. Aug 25 '11 at 10:36
    
If a couple of values in the code don't work out to what they should have after a successful SQL statement execution then I need to terminate the transaction, this as far as I can see would not be a PDO error, but more to do with application logic, so I need to throw a different error that isn't PDO related. To me PDOException is to do with SQL errors, connections issues etc. Not returned values which IMO should be handled differently. I think Prisoner below has nailed it for me with the double catch block. :) Thanks. –  Crispy Beef Aug 25 '11 at 10:41
    
If you try to insert an invalid value in your tables, MySQL should complain and then PDO raises an exception. Why would you check for values in your app if you can use foreign key constraints / unique constraints and type-safety to check if what's going to database is correct? –  N.B. Aug 25 '11 at 11:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
try {
    // PDO code

    // Transaction start

    // Throw manual exception here if error occurs (transaction rollback too)
    throw new MyException("all went tits up");

   // Transaction commit

} catch (PDOException $e) {
    // Transaction rollback
    // Code to handle the exception
} catch (MyException $e) {
    // Transaction rollback
    // Code to handle the exception   
}

The thing is, you're going to have duplicate code which wont smell too nice. I would recommend just catching "Exception" e.g.:

try {
    // PDO code

    // Transaction start

    // Throw manual exception here if error occurs (transaction rollback too)
    throw new MyException("all went tits up");

   // Transaction commit

} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Transaction rollback
    // Code to handle the exception
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I think the first example works best for me. While I can see the annoyance of duplicate code, I could always use a custom function for I only reference that and pass on the exception object to that hopefully minimising any duplication. My main thing is to differentiate between exceptions I'm throwing based on other erros and actual PDO error conditions like dodgy SQL or connections issues. –  Crispy Beef Aug 25 '11 at 10:38
    
Yeah, in that case go with the first option :) –  Prisoner Aug 25 '11 at 10:39
try{
    //code here
}
catch(PDOException $e){
    //handle PDO
    throw $e; //to rethrow it upper if need
}
catch(Exception $e){
    //handle any other
}
share|improve this answer

If something is going wrong PDO will generate exception. But if you make some changes in db and would like to revert all you can run

throw new PDOException(....);
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I wanted to avoid as the PHP manual specifically state that you should not throw PDOException from your own code. –  Crispy Beef Aug 25 '11 at 10:53
    
@Crispy-Beef In manual is written: You shouldn't but not mustn't and I think it's necessary to check how it works instead of creation addition try catch block. Not sure that this one is cause for downvoting. –  Andrej L Aug 25 '11 at 11:00

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