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I am trying to pass tokens through pipes and execvp... However my problem is that 1st and 2nd child processes receive the same tokens... and what can be done if there is a third or more tokens?

    int pipedes[2];
    pipe(pipedes);

    pid_t pid = fork();
    if (pid == 0) {
            dup2(filedes[1], 1);

            execvp(argv[0], argv);
    } else {
            close(pipedes[1]);
    }

    pid = fork();
    if (pid == 0) {
            dup2(pipedes[0], 0);

            execvp(arg[0], argv);
    }

    wait(&pid);

and tokens

strtok(line, "|");

            pipe(line);
            while (1) {

                    line= strtok(NULL, "|");

                    pipe(line);
            }
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That is not valid code, check the manpage for pipe (2). –  Steve-o Aug 25 '11 at 11:20
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2 Answers

This line:

pipe(line);

is nonsense. It creates two new file descriptors and overwrites the first 2 x sizeof(int) bytes of line with them. Your producer process should be writing the tokens to stdout and your consumer process should read them from stdin.

By the way, your child processes appear to execute the same executable as the parent with exactly the same arguments. How does each one know whether it is the producer or consumer?

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well, at the moment i wnt the child processes to execute different tokens using my tokinizer..is it possible? –  mrKennedy Aug 25 '11 at 11:33
    
I think you have misunderstood what pipes are for and how they work. When you create a pipe you get a read file descriptor and a write file descriptor. Everything you write to the write file descriptor can be read from the read descriptor. You need two pipes, one for each child and you need to write to them alternately. –  JeremyP Aug 25 '11 at 13:01
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If you want to have two different child executing the same executable, but using two different commands, you will need to setup two different pipes for each child process. Your process for setting up the pipes is also incorrect since you allow the child to leave a pipe open.

#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <
int pipedes_child_1[2];
int pipedes_child_2[2];

pipe(pipedes_child_1);

pid_t child = fork();

if (!child)
{
    dup2(pipedes_child_1[0], 0);
    close(pipedes_child_1[1]); //without this, child with hang on read()
    execvp(argv[0], argv);
}
else
{
    close(pipedes_child_1[0];
}

pipe(pipedes_child_2);

child = fork();

if (!child)
{
    dup2(pipedes_child_2[0], 0);
    close(pipe_des_child_2[1]);  //without this, child with hang on read()
    execvp(argv[0], argv);
}
else
{
    close(pipedes_child_2[0]);
}

//...write tokens to each child via pipedes_child_X[1];

//wait for all the children
int return_val = 0;
while(wait(&return_val) > 0 || errno != EINTR);

Keep in mind, that since you are calling execvp(argv[0], argv), you are actually going to make an infinitely recursive "fan" of processes since you're just recalling the current process with the current arguments ... I don't think that's what you're wanting. To prevent that, let's say you specify the child processes as arguments to the main parent executable, and pass those values as the programs to launch when calling one of the exec family of functions. So for instance:

//child_1 executable that will take no arguments and read from the pipe
execlp(argv[1], argv[1], (char*)0);

//child_2 executable that will take no arguments and read from the pipe
execlp(argv[2], argv[2], (char*)0);
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