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I have two set of samples that are time independent. I would like to merge them and calculate the missing values for the times where I do not have values of both. Simplified example:

A <- cbind(time=c(10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100),
           Avalue=c(1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 2))
B <- cbind(time=c(15, 30, 45, 60), Bvalue=c(100, 200, 300, 400))
C <- merge(A,B, all=TRUE)

   time Avalue Bvalue
1    10      1     NA
2    15     NA    100
3    20      2     NA
4    30      3    200
5    40      2     NA
6    45     NA    300
7    50      1     NA
8    60      2    400
9    70      3     NA
10   80      2     NA
11   90      1     NA
12  100      2     NA

By assuming linear change between each sample, it is possible to calculate the missing NA values. Intuitively it is easy to see that the A value at time 15 and 45 should be 1.5. But a proper calculation for B for instance at time 20 would be

100 + (20 - 15) * (200 - 100) / (30 - 15)

which equals 133.33333. The first parenthesis being the time between estimate time and the last sample available. The second parenthesis being the difference between the nearest samples. The third parenthesis being the time between the nearest samples.

How can I use R to calculate the NA values?

share|improve this question
    
Should this be renamed "interpolate" or "impute" ("...missing values")? I don't think "extrapolation" applies here. –  Iterator Aug 25 '11 at 15:28
    
Yes, you are correct, interpolation is the correct term. I will update –  hlovdal Aug 25 '11 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using the zoo package:

library(zoo)
Cz <- zoo(C)
index(Cz) <- Cz[,1]
Cz_approx <- na.approx(Cz)
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. I do not quite understand what the index(Cz) <- Cz[,1] statement is doing, care to explain? –  hlovdal Aug 25 '11 at 11:17
    
By default, the na.approx() function uses the index(obj) as points between which to interpolate each column of the dataframe. Default index is 1:12, so I replaced it with actual time measurements using index(). However, if you would like to preserve the default index, you can invoke na.approx(Cz, x=Cz$time). –  Anatoliy Aug 25 '11 at 11:26
    
library(zoo); ?index "Description: Generic functions for extracting the index of an object and replacing it." You're manipulating parts of a zoo object. Always a good idea to RTFM before asking questions. –  Carl Witthoft Aug 25 '11 at 11:27
2  
Note that converting the data frame to zoo could also be written as Cz <- read.zoo(C) which automatically assumes the first column holds the times. Also zoo's na.approx has a default method that works on ordinary vectors so even without converting C to zoo we could do this: C$Bvalue <- na.approx(C$Bvalue, C$time, na.rm = FALSE). –  G. Grothendieck Aug 25 '11 at 12:00

The proper way to do this statistically and still get valid confidence intervals is to use Multiple Imputation. See Rubin's classic book, and there's an excellent R package for this (mi).

share|improve this answer
    
Care to provide a citation for the Rubin paper? –  Roman Luštrik Aug 25 '11 at 13:11
    
Can't find the paper. His book is classic as well; if I find the paper I'm thinking of later I'll edit further. –  Ari B. Friedman Aug 25 '11 at 19:43

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