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Basically I want inheritable functions as in

Base = function() { };

Base.prototype.foo = function() {
  console.log("base foo");
};

Derived = function() { };

somelib.inherit(Derived, Base);

Derived.prototype.foo = function() {
  console.log("derived foo");
}

d = new Derived():
d.foo();

And I want it to print

derived foo
base foo

Yes I know I can explicitly call Base.prototype.foo.call(this); I'm just wondering if there is a pattern for calling overridden super class functions automatically. The problem I'm trying to solve is 2 fold.

  1. derived classes should NOT have to remember to call their parent's method, it just happens automatically.
  2. if 1. can't happen then at least I'd like Derived not to call Base by name since that's brittle. Rather I'd like it call parentclass or something so you don't have to know the base. That way if you change the name of the base you don't have to go fixing every derived class.
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How often do you really need a destructor in Javascript, anyway? –  Karl Knechtel Aug 25 '11 at 11:19
    
You need it in long running applications e.g. refreshing its data by ajax calls. In order to avoid problems it might make sense to dispose (unlink) events and callbacks when an object is no longer needed (memory leaks). I am looking for a pattern as well. –  Horst Walter Sep 22 '11 at 12:31
    
Prototype.js eases the definition of such methods : var Derived = Class.create(Base, { dispose: function($super) { $super(); ... subclass disposal code ...; } });. It's not automatic, though. –  Francois Feb 21 '12 at 12:46
1  
Your question is difficult to answer because you say, "is there a good pattern..." when what you want to do is bad functionality itself. There's a reason no other languages call their parent functions implicitly. You need to call it explicitly. Albiet there are handy wrappers that help make it easier so you can call Derived.prototype.foo = function() { base(); console.log("derived foo"); } –  Dustin Graham Mar 12 '12 at 23:58

6 Answers 6

You can implement such functionality by using a structure like:

function Base(){}
Base.prototype.destroy = function(){console.log('Base destroy');};

function Derived(){}
Derived.prototype = new Base; // Let Derived inherit from Base

// Override the `destroy` method
Derived.prototype.destroy = function() {
    console.log('Derived destroy');

    // Call parent class method
    this.constructor.prototype.destroy();
    // If the context of the method is important, you can use Function.call:
  //this.constructor.prototype.destroy.call(this);
};


// Create an instance of Derived, and call the destroy method:
(new Derived).destroy();
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I would suggest thinking about exactly why you are doing this, at least in terms of requirement #1. Keep in mind that your desired pattern would take away a great deal of flexibility. For instance, if you have a situation where you want to print the statements in the opposite order:

    base foo
    derived foo

You would either have to abandon your pattern or create a function foo2() in the derived class which then calls foo() in the base class. Neither is very pretty.

Same goes if you even want to do something as simple as:

    derived foo
    base foo
    one more thing in the derived function

I would contend that using this pattern may work for the exact thing you want to do right now, but may give you fits when you want to make a seemingly trivial change down the road. All to save one line of code!

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As far as I know there is no language integrated destructor functionality in JavaScript. It is all about frameworks. If you are using ASP.NET Ajax, for example, the framework would expect that your objects would have a dispose method, responsible for freeing up resources (event handlers). So, it is up to you.

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Yes, I know there is no destructor functionality. What I'm trying to find it is if there is a good pattern for emulating something like a destructor. In particular, a destructor calls all of the base destructors automatically so a good pattern to do the same thing in JavaScript (for any function) is what I'm looking for. –  gman Aug 26 '11 at 4:53

Ok, this isn't quite what you are looking for, in that it's not a "pattern", but it is a potential implementation path you could follow:

Take a look @ the MooTools Class.Extras package (for lack of a better word). Using the Chain Class, you could probably get the desired functionality.

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var parent = (function () {
    var construct = function () {
    };

    construct.prototype = {
        constructor: construct,
        destroy: function () {
            console.log('parent destruction');
        }
    }

    return construct;
})();

var child = (function (parent) {
    var construct = function () {
    };

    construct.prototype = Object.create(parent.prototype);

    construct.prototype.constructor = construct;
    construct.prototype.destroy = function () {
       parent.prototype.destroy.call(this); // calling parent, too
       console.log('child destruction');
    };

    return construct;
})(parent);

child_instance = new child();
child_instance.destroy();
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I would prefer a way where I don't assign Derived = chainify() so that the api would be the same as you had in your question but as of right now this is the best way I can get it to work. It works by replacing each method of the object with a method that calls the replaced method and travels up the parent chain calling their methods along the way.

function chainify() {
    return function () {
        var property;
        for (property in this) {
            if (typeof this[property] === "function") {
                this[property] = chain(this[property], property);
            }
        }
        function chain(method, method_name) {
            return function() {
                method();
                var current = this;
                while (current = current.parent) {
                    if (current.hasOwnProperty(method_name)) {
                        current[method_name].apply(this, arguments);
                    }
                }
            };
        }
    }
}
var somelib = function() { };

somelib.inherit = function (derive, base) {
    derive.prototype = new base;
    derive.prototype.parent = base.prototype;
};

var Base = function() { };

Base.prototype.foo = function() {
  console.log("base foo");
};

var Derived = chainify();

somelib.inherit(Derived, Base);

Derived.prototype.foo = function() {
  console.log("derived foo");
};

d = new Derived();
d.foo();
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