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Naming convention for private fields

I read on msdn about C# naming conventions but they don't talk about naming private fields vs parameters.

public void SetAnimation(int framesX, int framesY)
{
    framesX = framesX; // the first one is private class member
    framesY = framesY;
}

I must name private field differently than a parameter. I can't do camel case for both. What do you suggest?

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marked as duplicate by JonH, AVD, Henning Makholm, marc_s, Jonathan Sampson Aug 25 '11 at 13:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This has got to be a duplicate I've seen this question so many times. –  JonH Aug 25 '11 at 12:03
1  
How about prefixing with _ for the private vars –  V4Vendetta Aug 25 '11 at 12:04

10 Answers 10

You can have same name. To have it more elegant, you can have:

this.framesX = framesX; // the first one is private class member
this.framesY = framesY;
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Only the first one is a private class member (as suggested with the comment), therefore i assume the declaration of framesY is omitted on the posted code (and this.framesY would not compile) –  UrbanEsc Aug 25 '11 at 12:04
    
I don't think he was trying to assign the parameter to itself. –  Shadow Wizard Aug 25 '11 at 12:27
    
Oh boy... ignore my comment. –  UrbanEsc Aug 25 '11 at 12:28

I generally do:

private int _framesX;
private int _framesY;

That makes it more clear:

public void SetAnimation(int framesX, int framesY)
{
    _framesX = framesX;
    _framesY = framesY;
}
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I think it's more appropriate to put the underscores on the parameter names. –  Brian Gordon Aug 25 '11 at 12:03
    
I like this more rather than using this. –  pokoko222 Aug 25 '11 at 12:03
1  
Yes, but the naming convention for C# recommends not using underscores. –  Darren Young Aug 25 '11 at 12:03
    
Yes they say don't use underscores. –  pokoko222 Aug 25 '11 at 12:04
    
@All - why are you making this complex, why change the name of something when you know for sure that it makes sense not to change it. Use this, it's very much legit and the right way. –  JonH Aug 25 '11 at 12:06

This really depends on the company you work at. Basically a naming convention is a team rule and for example, Resharper allows you to add a team convention

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You can name it the same, but if referring to the private member you have to use

this.framesX;

So for example;

this.framesX = framesX;
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I normaly name my private fields (are there others ;) ) with a '_' prefixed. For some people this is a smell others do the same - I guess it's a matter of taste.

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I use _framesX for marking private fields.

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You could go with the "_" prefix for private members or use "this.framesX" or both "this._framesX".

I'd say it depents on what your team is using.

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Your code is fine, you might need to specify this thought. Well thats how I name my Fields and parameters mostly.

public void SetAnimation(int framesX, int framesY)
{
    this.framesX = framesX; // the first one is private class member
    this.framesY = framesY;
}
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private variables should start with lowercase. so you've got that right.

you can make yr code work by using 'this' keyword to refer back to the instantiated object.

public void SetAnimation(int framesX, int framesY)
{
    this.framesX = framesX; // the first one is private class member
    this.framesY = framesY;
}
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I have a tendency to use only properties starting with a capital, and define the getter and setter public or private

public int FramesX { public get; private set; }
public int FramesY { get; set; }
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