Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With :

dalist = {{379, 219, 228, 401}, {387, 239, 230, 393}, 
          {403, 238, 217, 429}, {377, 233, 225, 432}}

BarChart@dalist

enter image description here

I would like to compute / Plot the relative frequency instead of absolute count for each Bin for each condition.

Where :

{379, 219, 228, 401}

are the 4 bins count for one condition. So :

{379, 219, 228, 401}[[1]]/Total@{379, 219, 228, 401}

enter image description here

is the result I want to see of the first condition / first Bin, instead of the count itself.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't this a question for Mathematics Q&A? –  Jose Faeti Aug 25 '11 at 12:18
    
I don`t think so, since, it is the implementation in Mathematica I am asking for. –  500 Aug 25 '11 at 12:20
    
Got it, I misread Mathematica with Mathematics :) –  Jose Faeti Aug 25 '11 at 12:23
    
@Jose a common mistake. We get a lot of guys trying to close questions based on this problem. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Aug 25 '11 at 22:06
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Isn't it

BarChart[dalist/Total /@ dalist]

?

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Beat me to it - +1 –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 12:28
    
@Leonid I see your (currently) deleted answer. Perhaps you should undelete it, just to provide another way to do the same. I think there is something there for a novice (comparing two ways to do the same thing is one of the many paths to learn Mma) –  belisarius Aug 25 '11 at 12:35
    
Fine, if you say so - I don't mind :) –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 12:36
    
@belisarius, Thank you + you forced me to work my functionnal programming skills : (#/Total /@ #) &@((Total /@ Transpose[AnglesBins[[#]]]) & /@ Range[4]) this was the reality of dalist ! –  500 Aug 25 '11 at 12:47
    
A more efficient version of your code would be #/Total[#, {2}] &[dalist] –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 13:27
add comment

belisarius beat me to it.

You might also want to explore BarChart[dalist, ChartLayout -> "Percentile"]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a ChartLayout -> "Percentile" option setting - I was not aware of it. –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 12:52
1  
There was something about Mathematica I knew and you didn't? Wow, I am surprised. –  Verbeia Aug 25 '11 at 12:54
2  
I don't think any single person knows more than a fraction of mma. Besides, when I was learning Mathematica programming (about 5-6 years ago), I learned a lot from your excellent site. –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 13:01
    
Seriously? That is really nice to know. Ted Ersek put a lot of work into those tips. I keep saying I will revamp the site one day, but real-life job expands to fill available space. –  Verbeia Aug 25 '11 at 13:07
1  
Revamping it sounds like a great idea, but I think even in its present form it is very useful - most of the stuff there still remains valid and useful. –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 25 '11 at 16:54
show 4 more comments

All you have to do is this:

In[13]:= #/Total[#] & /@ dalist

Out[13]= {{379/1227, 73/409, 76/409, 401/1227}, {387/1249, 239/1249, 
  230/1249, 393/1249}, {31/99, 238/1287, 217/1287, 1/3}, {377/1267, 
  233/1267, 225/1267, 432/1267}}

and chart it instead

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This was the approach I was in the middle of typing before I saw belisarius’ answer come up. Had to come up with an alternative –  Verbeia Aug 25 '11 at 12:48
    
And this is exactly what I came to from Belisarius`s on my own. Thank You so much, I think i am making progress ! –  500 Aug 25 '11 at 12:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.