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I try to give p elements different id's and then give every p a content. Here some of my previous work:

while(i<=10){
    $.ajax({    
        url: "tabelle.html",
        success: function(data) {
            $('div').append("<p id='+i+'></p>");
            $('#"+i+"').html(data);
        },
        error: function(){
            alert('nein!');
        },  
    });     
    i++;
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div>
<p> </p>
</div>

But it isn´t working, can anybody help? You said I should be more specific, what isn´t working. The problem is, that it isn´t doing anything...

share|improve this question
    
What exactly isn't working? –  markus Aug 25 '11 at 12:23
    
I assume every element has the same id, 11? You should google/search for function definition inside loop. Btw, the trailing , in the Ajax options will be a problem in IE. Edit: Missed the concatenation mistake, but my point is still valid. –  Felix Kling Aug 25 '11 at 12:24
    
I assume every element has the same id, '+i+' –  jAndy Aug 25 '11 at 12:25
    
According standard the ID shouldn't start by a number. –  yvan Aug 25 '11 at 12:25
    
@yvan In HTML5 (not necessarily relevant here, though) almost anything is allowed for an ID. It "must be unique amongst all the IDs in the element's home subtree and must contain at least one character. The value must not contain any space characters." More here. –  jensgram Aug 25 '11 at 12:30

7 Answers 7

You are using single and double quotes next to each other instead of together.

$('div').append("<p id='+i+'></p>");

should be

$('div').append("<p id="+i+"></p>");

and

$('#"+i+"').html(data);

should be

$('#'+i).html(data);

Also, an elements id can't start with a number, so add some text in front:

$('#prefix_'+i).html(data);
share|improve this answer
    
That is true, but even when this is fixed it will not work. –  Felix Kling Aug 25 '11 at 12:32

The error function as the last parameter in your $.ajax() call is followed by a comma, but no other parameters are inserted after that. You may want to remove that comma.

Additionally, from what I understand, you are assigning numerical IDs. By definition this is not allowed. IDs must begin with a letter.

var id = 0;
for ( var x = 0; x < 10; x++ ){
    $.ajax({    
        url: "tabelle.html",
        success: function(data) {
            $('<p>').attr('id','p'+id).html(data).appendTo($('div'));
            id++;
        },
        error: function(){
            alert('nein!');
        } 
    });
}

I added "p" at the start of each ID.

To avoid the same ID problem, no need to fancy code stuff, just create a variable before the loop which will keep tracks of created IDs, and increment it each time a new element is created.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, good spot –  JamesHalsall Aug 25 '11 at 12:29
    
That will still assign each element the same ID. –  Felix Kling Aug 25 '11 at 12:33
    
@Felix Kling: True, didn't spot that, anyway the question was a little bit too vague for me... just "but it isn't working" it's not always easy to interpret. –  Jose Faeti Aug 25 '11 at 12:37
    
@Jose: I totally agree... that's why I didn't even want to answer in the first place ;) –  Felix Kling Aug 25 '11 at 12:40

Apart from the concatenation problem, the problem is that each callback has a reference to the same i and at the time the callbacks are executed, the loop finished. All elements will have the ID 11.

You might think that each iteration waits until the Ajax call returns, but that is not the case. Ajax is asynchronous, the "surrounding" code does not wait for Ajax calls to finish (that's why you have to pass a callback).

The other issue is that JavaScript does not have block scope. You can create a new scope and "capture" the value of i be calling a function. Here is an example with an immediate (or self-involing) function:

while(i<=10) {
    (function(index) {
        $.ajax({    
            url: "tabelle.html",
            success: function(data) {
                $('<p />', {id: 'prefix' + index, html: data})
                 .appendTo('#divId');
            },
            error: function(){
                alert('nein!');
            }
        });
    }(i++));
}

Another solution would be to put the Ajax call in a named function and call it from the loop (passing the current index):

while(i<=10) {
    makeAjaxCall(i++);
}

In your special case, you don't even need to make the Ajax request in the loop. You are not sending any parameters to the server. In this case, you can iterate inside the success callback instead:

$.ajax({    
    url: "tabelle.html",
    success: function(data) {
        var $p = $("<p />", {html: data}),
            $div = $('#divId');
            i = 1; //?
        while(i<=10) {
            $div.append($p.clone().attr('id', 'prefix' + i);
        }
    },
    error: function(){
        alert('nein!');
    }
});

It is good to make as few requests as possible. Another option would be to send structured data as response (e.g. JSON [Wikipedia]), parse it and process it accordingly.

Things to consider:

  • In HTML4, IDs are not allowed to start with numbers. Although it most likely will work in all browsers, better prefix the ID with characters (it is valid in HTML5 though).

  • $('div') will select all divs in the page. That does not seem to be a problem in your specific example, but if your structure gets more complex, make sure you append the new element to only one element (otherwise you will have multiple elements with the same ID.

  • Trailing commas in object literals cause problems in IE.

  • You might have problems issuing so many requests at the same time. You could make the requests one by one by using jQuery's Deferred objects.

share|improve this answer
while(i<=10){
    $.ajax({    
        url: "tabelle.html",
        success: function(data) {
            $('div').append("<p id='element" + i + "'></p>");
            $('#'+i).html(data);
        },
        error: function(){
            alert('nein!');
        } 
    });     
    i++;
}

EDIT: It's also worth mentioning... don't make ajax requests in a loop. Make one request which returns all your required data and then loop over the result instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, there was a concatenation mistake too... but that still won't work. –  Felix Kling Aug 25 '11 at 12:26

First things first, you've mixed up your quotes in this line:

$('div').append("<p id='+i+'></p>");

That should be

$('div').append("<p id='" +i+ "'></p>");

But, stop! id's cannot begin with a numeric, so change this to

$('div').append("<p id='something" +i+ "'></p>");

where "something" must start with a character or underscore.

Then change the other line to

$('#something' +i).html(data);
share|improve this answer

Your string concatenation looks wrong. Your start with single quotes and use double to concat.

Use

"<p id="+ i +"></p>"

OR even better

'<p id="'+ i +'"></p>'
share|improve this answer

There are multiple issues with your code.

First, make sure HTML correct (you have given us only a snippet of it). Second, make sure jQuery is loaded when the script is called.

But the main issue is with incorrect quotes:

$('div').append("<p id='+i+'></p>");

should be replaced by

$('div').append('<p id="' + i + '"></p>');

and

$('#"+i+"').html(data);

should be replaced by

$('#' + i).html(data);

Let us know if this helped - there may be additional issues.

EDIT:

As others mentioned, your id is incorrect (should not start with a number, maybe add "p-" prefix before i), also the trailing comma is not good - you should remove it. Additionally you can use for instead of while and increments; plus you should not use i as global variable. The resulting JS code would look like this:

for(var i=1; i<=10; i++){
    $.ajax({    
        url: 'tabelle.html',
        success: function(data) {
            $('div').append('<p id="p-' + i + '"></p>');
            $('#p-' + i).html(data);
        },
        error: function(){
            alert('nein!');
        } 
    });
}
share|improve this answer

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