Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm new to smart-card development. Please help me understand how to get started.

  1. What's the relationship between Java Card and JCOP?
  2. How do I map a JCOP version to a GlobalPlatform Card Specification? For example, what specification does JCOP 2.4.1 map to?
  3. When do I need to code against one API versus the other?
  4. Where can I find good tutorials for getting started?
share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted
  1. JCOP is a hardware platform originally from IBM that combines Javacard and GlobalPlatform (formerly Open Platform).
  2. JCOP 2.4.1? Probably GP 2.1.1. Do a web search for specific product specifications.
  3. javacard and GP:
    • Javacard is used to write applications - javacard applets - for smartcard platforms, using the Java Programming language and a limited version of the JVM and java libraries.
    • GlobalPlatform is a specification for managing applet-aware smartcards, defining operations for things like:
      • managing card lifecycle,
      • card/host authentication,
      • installing/deleting/instantiating/selecting applets, and
      • managing security policies on the card.
    • Using GlobalPlatform you'll exchange APDUs with the GP card for the aforementioned operations; using javacard you'll write applets that can accept and process APDUs that are specific to your application. GlobalPlatform isn't javacard specific, but javacard is the only relevant technology for smartcard applet development.
  4. For javacard tutorials, start with the javacard site. Look through the documentation section for Getting Started stuff. Download the dev kit and you'll find some html howtos. For GlobalPlatform, you'll need to begin with the latest GP spec; it's certainly not a tutorial, but I don't think you'll find anything more useful. The spec will require strong smartcard fundamentals. Also see Required Things to start Smartcard Programming Using Javacard
share|improve this answer
    
Re: #2, I can't find the JCOP specifications anywhere. Does JCOP even have a dedicated website? Re: #3, that's a bit weird because the book "Java Card Technology for Smart Cards: Architecture and Programmer's Guide" claims that GlobalPlatform is just an extension of JavaCard that adds extra features. It seems to imply that JavaCard contains the basic mechanisms used to install/remove applets and do authentication. Have I missed something? – Gili Aug 25 '11 at 23:44

I used this excellent tutorial when started with JavaCard: http://javacard.vetilles.com/tutorial/

share|improve this answer
    
The link does not work anymore, unfortunately... – vojta Oct 5 '15 at 9:17

jcManager http://www.brokenmill.com/2010/03/java-secure-card-manager/ comes with source code, which is useful

share|improve this answer
    
oops, the authenticate_SCP02 function is killing my JCOP41 cards! I believed that 10 failed authentications were needed to kill a card, but this function is killing them promptly. – g bruno Aug 26 '11 at 2:03
    
OK my, fault, an error in transcription, not an error in jcManager code. But note: Sudden death of JCOP card is possible. – g bruno Aug 26 '11 at 2:15

This might be useful - I spent a while getting older tutorials working on real hardware (e.g. physical Java Cards with GP), including sending APDUs etc. I've collected some of my notes into a video format as it was too much work to write down every little thing.

The video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj2l0X8D4y0&hd=1 and includes basically a quick run-through of what to install, building a program, installing to a Java Card, and talking to said program via Python. It's very very basic but sometimes that's what you need...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.