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Im trying to figure out the most effective way to parse som quite complicated XML using SimpleXML, and I've become stuck when there are namespaces in the document.

Okay, so my XML looks something like this:

<ns:event xmls:ns="http://example.com/event/1.1">
   <ns:eventinfo>
       <ns:start year="2011" month="9" />
       <ns:eventnames>
           <ns:eventname>Superevent</ns:eventname>
       </ns:eventnames>
   </ns:eventinfo>
   <ns:eventlocale>My place</ns:eventlocale>
</ns:event> 

I am able to extract the information from the "normal" tags via:

$data = simplexml_load_string($xml);
foreach ($data->children('ns', true) as $children) {
    $child = $children->children('ns',true);
    $eventname = ($child->eventname);
}

This would give $eventname as Superevent. However, this approach doesn't work with attributes...

But if there wouldn't be any namespaces, I would easily extract the attributes with for example:

$startyear = $data->$start['year'];

So - anyone got an idea to approach this problem with ease? Any info or ideas would be much appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you considered using SimpleXML's xpath functionality?

// your data example missed an 'n' in xmlns, so reposted, just to be sure
// with some additional ns:event elements in a root element
$xml = '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<root>
    <ns:event xmlns:ns="http://example.com/event/1.1">
       <ns:eventinfo>
           <ns:start year="2011" month="9" />
           <ns:eventnames>
               <ns:eventname>Superevent</ns:eventname>
           </ns:eventnames>
       </ns:eventinfo>
       <ns:eventlocale>My place</ns:eventlocale>
    </ns:event>
    <ns:event xmlns:ns="http://example.com/event/1.1">
       <ns:eventinfo>
           <ns:start year="2011" month="8" />
           <ns:eventnames>
               <ns:eventname>Another Superevent</ns:eventname>
           </ns:eventnames>
       </ns:eventinfo>
       <ns:eventlocale>Your place</ns:eventlocale>
    </ns:event>
</root>';

$data = simplexml_load_string($xml);
$data->registerXPathNamespace( 'ns', 'http://example.com/event/1.1' );

# '//ns:event' means: find ns:event elements anywhere in the document
# '/ns:event' would mean: find ns:event elements that are direct children of the root
$events = $data->xpath( '//ns:event' );
foreach( $events as $event )
{

    # from now on, we are using $event (ns:event elements) as our contexts to query

    # '.' means: from our current context node find...
    # '/ns:eventinfo[1]' means: find the first ns:eventinfo element that is a direct child of the preceding expression
    # '/ns:eventnames[1]' means: same as previous but ns:eventnames element
    # '/ns:eventname[1]' means: same as previous but ns:eventname element
    $eventname   = $event->xpath( './ns:eventinfo[1]/ns:eventnames[1]/ns:eventname[1]' );

    # '/@year' means: the year attribute that is a direct child of the preceding expression
    $year        = $event->xpath( './ns:eventinfo[1]/ns:start[1]/@year' );

    # '/@month' means: same as previous but month attribute
    $month       = $event->xpath( './ns:eventinfo[1]/ns:start[1]/@month' );

    $eventlocale = $event->xpath( './ns:eventlocale[1]' );

    # echo the first elements from the results found by our xpath queries
    echo 'Event "' . $eventname[ 0 ] . '" taking place at ' . $eventlocale[ 0 ] . ' sometime in ' . $month[ 0 ] . '/' . $year[ 0 ] . '<br>';
}

edit:

What I did in the previous example was rather verbose by the way. This should probably work just as well inside the loop, as you are taking the first found nodes anyway already in the echo statement:

# relative to our context node '.' find all descendants '//' that is an ns:eventname element
$eventname   = $event->xpath( './/ns:eventname' );
# relative to our context node '.' find all descendants '//' that is a year attribute of an ns:start element
$year        = $event->xpath( './/ns:start/@year' );
# relative to our context node '.' find all descendants '//' that is a month attribute of an ns:start element
$month       = $event->xpath( './/ns:start/@month' );
# relative to our context node '.' find all children '/' that is an ns:eventlocale element
$eventlocale = $event->xpath( './ns:eventlocale' );
share|improve this answer
    
I've read some about it, but not fully grasped it. In my case - the xmls-link is dead, does that matter? What does that URL do exactly anyway? I will definitely look into it tomorrow. Looks promising, thanks! –  Marcus Aug 25 '11 at 15:13
1  
@Marcus: it's a meaningless string other than to uniquely create a namespace for the elements. Using URI formats has become somewhat of a de facto standard, to identify namespaces in an XML document. 'my.namspace.foo' would have been just as valid. (Althought there are probably some restrictions to what characters one can use.). Namespaces are used if there may be multiple elements with the same name, but representing a different meaning inside an XML document. Similar use a namespaces in Object Oriented Programming See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XML_namespace for more on XML namespaces. –  Decent Dabbler Aug 25 '11 at 15:21
1  
@Marcus: furthermore, URI formats are handy since they are (or at least the domainname is) unique. If you are the owner of the domain, and assuming nobody else is bold enough to use your domain as an XML namespace, you can be confident there will be no conflicts if your XML elements are merged in someone else's XML structure. –  Decent Dabbler Aug 25 '11 at 15:27
    
Thank you very much for your excellent explanations! I will read up on it, and post back here tomorrow if I manage to get it to work. Thanks. –  Marcus Aug 25 '11 at 16:34
1  
@Marcus: you are very welcome. Additionally I've added some comments to explain the xpath queries briefly for you. I may have mixed jargon up a little as I'm not formally trained in xpath (or XML). But I hope it's clear nonetheless and you get the gist of what xpath is about. Its syntax has many resemblances with navigating through filesystem paths in PHP or in some shell, additionally with very powerful syntax to do additional filtering with. –  Decent Dabbler Aug 25 '11 at 21:09

You can use something like before you use simplexml_load_string:

$xml = preg_replace("/(<\/?)(\w+):([^>]*>)/", "$1$2$3", $xml);

See http://php.net/manual/en/function.preg-replace.php for the explanation ot the replacement parameter ("$1$2$3").

This will change <ns:eventinfo> to <nseventinfo>

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Remove the tags completely? That doesn't do much good =) –  Marcus Aug 25 '11 at 13:46

In your example, shouldn't it be $children->start['year'] not $data->start['year']?

Here is an example of it working:

http://codepad.org/8i0fHYdo

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You may access eventname by code:

$data->children("http://example.com/event/1.1")->eventinfo->children("http://example.com/event/1.1")->eventnames->children("http://example.com/event/1.1")->eventname

More detail about how to use children and parse XML with namespace may be found on my post Parse XML with namespace by SimpleXML in PHP. The XML is generated from Salesforce Output Message which contains XML namespace. I use SimpleXML to parse it with the help of children().

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