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What is the shortest and most efficient way to decompose a string array into an array of int's if the string looks like:

4 1 4 2 3
5 1 4 2 -1 6

The way I have it now is to use String split method and iterate the String array into int's.. Is there a better way than this?

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3  
Efficient by what criteria - conciseness, speed, memory usage, or ...? –  Péter Török Aug 25 '11 at 14:24
    
Shortest and most efficient are sometimes mutually exclusive. For example, bubble sort is shorter compared to quick sort, but quick sort is faster. Aso most efficient is an ambigious term. Do you want it to be memory-efficient or CPU-efficient? –  Behrang Aug 25 '11 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's fine - I'd just call split(" ") and then use Integer.parseInt() on the resulting elements.

If you could potentially have more than one space between the ints, you'll need something like split("\\s+") for it to work properly.

If that's what you're doing, I don't think there's a better way!

EDIT: Perhaps I should qualify the term better - I mean that for all practical purposes, unless you're really hitting performance critical issues, I'd stick with this method since it's clean and easy to understand what's going on!

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1  
Good answer, just a note, split(" ") will not cope with strings having more than one space between the elements (use " +" or "\\s+") to be sure. –  dacwe Aug 25 '11 at 14:31
    
@dacwe thanks for that, I've edited accordingly - I just assumed there wouldn't be given the example but you're right, it's better to be sure! –  berry120 Aug 25 '11 at 14:35
    
@berry120 there may not be a better way practically but I have made some code to prove that academically there are far better ways. –  Farmor Aug 25 '11 at 15:28
    
@Farmor Yes - I've updated the answer to qualify what I meant now. Interesting answer though! –  berry120 Aug 25 '11 at 15:44

Using split() consumes more space [and time], as new String objects are created, but it is far more elegant [and simple] then any other way.

unless performance is very critical, I'd stick with this way.

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@dacwe: before the split() was used, there was 1 String object, and after it n objects. objects must be created. though the char[] is not being duplicated [instead the offset and size are being used] does not say objects are not created. –  amit Aug 25 '11 at 14:35

Algorithm 3times faster than the split method! :)

Just for the fun of it I have made an algorithm that is far faster than the split method. Maybe nothing you should use as I would say split is cleaner and cleaner is far more important than speed. Also the Donald Knuth quote of premature optimizations are the root cause of all evil.

Output

1189ms // My algorithm first loop
3305ms // Split algorithm runtime first loop
1173ms // My algorithm second loop
3305ms // Split algorithm second loop

The code

import java.util.ArrayList;

class FarmorsOptimized {

@SuppressWarnings({ "rawtypes", "unchecked" })
private static ArrayList getFarmors(String s) {
    ArrayList intArr = new ArrayList();
    int stopvalue = s.length() ;
    for (int i = 0; i < stopvalue;) {
        int negativ = 0;
        if (s.charAt(i) == '-') {
            negativ = 1;
        }
        intArr.add(Integer.parseInt(s.substring(i, i+1+negativ)));
        i+=2+negativ;
    }
    return intArr;
}

@SuppressWarnings({ "rawtypes", "unchecked" })
private static ArrayList getSplits(String s) {
    ArrayList intArr = new ArrayList();
    for(String str : s.split(" ")){
        intArr.add(Integer.parseInt(str));
    }
    return intArr;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s = "1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7 1 2 4 -6 7";
    int times = 1000000;
    //Just to init everything
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getFarmors(s);
        getSplits(s);
    }
    long starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getFarmors(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getSplits(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getFarmors(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getSplits(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
}
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Not sure I'd advise using it in practice but academically it's an interesting approach! –  berry120 Aug 25 '11 at 15:45
    
yea, this is an overkill, for a simpler things that I am doing, but thanks for adding some new knowledge –  adit Aug 25 '11 at 16:15
    
please don't make announcements about '3 times faster' based on a microbenchmark. However, I'd love to see a real benchmark [random number, change the order of methods, etc...]. also note, that this solution also creates new objects String objects, and thus consumes more space. also, this solution seems to work only for ints in range [-9,9], and not all ints! –  amit Aug 25 '11 at 17:44
    
@amit I am not sure if you are a troll or not, you have been provided with all the code, test it for yourself before bashing. Now lets break down your comments, I am genuinely interested in the explanation if any of your remarks are valid. 1. The order of the methods, first I run both methods 1 000 000 to warm up the JIT. Then I got almost identical benchmark time for benchmark 1,3 and 2,4.? 2. Where do my solution create new String objects? Locally in the for loop wouldn't it be true that the gc removes and not require more space but instead less? –  Farmor Aug 25 '11 at 19:36
    
Of course it only works for the range [-9,9] have you read the question? At first I had an implementation for all int but only got it twice as fast as the split, look at my edits and you can see the implementation and benchmark for that. Then I say it was only single digit ints and optimized it further. –  Farmor Aug 25 '11 at 19:37

Answer to comment discussion. This answer works for all ints. It's significantly faster than the split.

1295ms my
2193ms split
1155ms my
1889ms split

code

import java.util.ArrayList;

class FarmorsOptimized {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s = "32324 -324 873249 -8544876 -74093 -3243274 4325 643286 92325 -21376218 -213 2132531 2314 1 2";
    int times = 1000000;
    long starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getFarmors(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getSplits(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getFarmors(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
    starttime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        getSplits(s);
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - starttime);
}

@SuppressWarnings({ "rawtypes", "unchecked" })
private static ArrayList getFarmors(String s) {
    ArrayList intArr = new ArrayList();
    int stopvalue = s.length();
    for (int i = 0; i < stopvalue;) {
        int j = 0;
        while (true) {
            if ((i + j) == stopvalue || s.charAt(i + j) == ' ') {
                break;
            }
            j++;
        }
        intArr.add(Integer.parseInt(s.substring(i, i + j)));
        i += j + 1;
    }
    return intArr;
}

@SuppressWarnings({ "rawtypes", "unchecked" })
private static ArrayList getSplits(String s) {
    ArrayList intArr = new ArrayList();
    String[] strArr = s.split(" ");
    for(int i = 0; i < strArr.length ; i++){
        intArr.add(Integer.parseInt(strArr[i]));
    }
    return intArr;
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
much more intresting result then your previous answer. +1 –  amit Aug 26 '11 at 8:05
    
thanks and sorry for my harsh tone before. –  Farmor Aug 26 '11 at 8:10

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