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I'm looking to replace a lot of my perl with scala. One of the things I tend to do a lot is call binaries (usually compiled C++, but could be java, other perl scripts, q scripts, etc) provided to me by other teams at my company.

For example, to do some complex math, I'd start one of the foreign binaries, then pipe my inputs to it. I'd then listen to its stdout stream for results, and stderr stream for diagnostic messages. In perl, I'd do this using a POE::Wheel::Run widget. I've come up with something analogous (and much nicer) in scala, but I'd like to make it more robust. It's a little wrapper around a ProcessIO object. It looks like this:

class Exe(command: String, out: String => Unit, err: String => Unit) {

    import scala.sys.process._
    import scala.io._
    import java.io._
    import scala.concurrent._

    val inputStream = new SyncVar[OutputStream];

    val process = Process(command).run(
        new ProcessIO(
            stdin => inputStream.put(stdin),
            stdout => Source.fromInputStream(stdout).getLines.foreach(out),
            stderr => Source.fromInputStream(stderr).getLines.foreach(err)));

    def write(s: String): Unit = synchronized {
        inputStream.get.write((s + "\n").getBytes)
    }

    def close(): Unit = {
        inputStream.get.close
    }
}

I'd then use it like this:

val exe = new Exe("tr [a-z] [A-Z]", 
                  out => println("o: " + out), 
                  err => println("e: " + err))
exe.write("lower")
exe.close()

Which prints out:

o: LOWER

This gets me 90% there, but what would be nice would be to get a callback when the process exits. It may exit because I've closed the input stream and its internal loop stops, it may exit on its own, or it may exit because I've killed it. In the callback, it would be good to know why it stopped, and the exit code.

I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to go about this, any help would be appreciated (and any edits to the above code are, of course, welcome - I'm a bit of a noob).

I'm using 2.9.0.1

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2  
Personally, I think it sucks that Process doesn't have some kind of isFinished polling method. That's one thing I'd change, though the solution provided by didierd seems more like what you want. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 26 '11 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can wait for the end of a process calling exitValue. You might do that in a separate thread, in which the callback will happen. Maybe class Process could be pimped thus:

import scala.concurrent.ops.spawn
implicit def ProcessWithCallback(p: Process) {
  def whenTerminatedDo(callback: Int => Unit) = spawn{
    val exitValue = p.exitValue; callback(p)
  }
}

You could then use that in Exe as you like.

The Process class given by the JVM and wrapped by scala.sys.Process is really rather feable, it will be hard not to block a thread

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1  
There's no way to get a callback without a separate thread blocked or polling (no matter what support process provided). That said, polling would have been nice. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 26 '11 at 1:13
    
@Daniel. My issue with the the JVM Process is that because it does not provide such a method (not even a timed wait!), we cannot do better than using a Thread. If the Process API was bigger (in java), providing a method such as the one discussed here, the JVM could make use of OS-specific features in some implementations and do the thread stuff by itself if need be in others. I'm not familiar with system programming, but I remember SIGCHLD under UNIX, no waiting thread was needed - nor really available in those days ;-). Do I miss something? –  Didier Dupont Aug 26 '11 at 7:42
    
SIGCHLD is an interruption. There are no interruptions in the JVM model. Well, this link suggests there's a non-standard way about it. Anyway, the problem is the lack of a standard interrupt mechanism. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 26 '11 at 12:27
    
@Daniel. I think we misunderstand. I was regretting some feature (smth. akin to addShutdownHook in class Process) lacking in java API. My idea was that a JVM implementation to make use of SIGCHLD to implement efficiently some "addShutdownHook" method in class java.lang.Process, not that such a thing would go beyond implementation internals, or could be done in the scala api. Or is even that impossible? –  Didier Dupont Aug 26 '11 at 12:49
1  
I'm not an expert in JVM, but from my understanding of it, there's no standard way to interrupt execution in a thread to run an interrupt handler. To do any such callback, a thread would have to be created somewhere. On the other hand, to retrieve an exit status requires a thread (one has to fork, exec the child and have the parent wait on it), so I suppose there is a place for such hook already. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 26 '11 at 13:52

Have you considered spawning a new thread which will then call the blocking method process.exitValue()? You can then call your callback.

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updated version using spawn to create a new thread that blocks and waits for the exit code

class Exe(command:String, out:String=>Unit, err:String=>Unit, onExit:Int=>Unit) {

    import scala.sys.process._
    import scala.io._
    import java.io._
    import scala.concurrent._
    import scala.concurrent.ops.spawn

    val inputStream = new SyncVar[OutputStream];

    val process = Process(command).run(
        new ProcessIO(
            stdin => inputStream.put(stdin),
            stdout => Source.fromInputStream(stdout).getLines.foreach(out),
            stderr => Source.fromInputStream(stderr).getLines.foreach(err)));

    spawn { onExit(process.exitValue()) }

    def write(s:String):Unit = synchronized {
        inputStream.get.write((s + "\n").getBytes)
    }

    def close():Unit = {
        inputStream.get.close
    }
}

can use like this

import java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch

val latch = new CountDownLatch(1)

val exe = new Exe("tr [a-z] [A-Z]",
        out => println("o: " + out), 
        err => println("e: " + err), 
        code=> {println(code) ; latch.countDown() })
exe.write("lower") 
exe.close()

latch.await

prints

o: LOWER
0

thanks everyone!

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