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What is the difference between NULL and character(0) | integer(0) etc?

> identical(NULL, character(0))
[1] FALSE

> is.null(integer(0))
[1] FALSE

> str(character(0))
 chr(0) 

> str(NULL)
 NULL

In general it seems you can pass NULL as parameters into functions, and that an empty vector is generally returned as character(0), integer(0), etc.

Why is this the case? Come to think of it, is there a test for zero-ness, a la is.integer0?

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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The R Language Definition has this on NULL:

There is a special object called NULL. It is used whenever there is a need to indicate or specify that an object is absent. It should not be confused with a vector or list of zero length. The NULL object has no type and no modifiable properties. There is only one NULL object in R, to which all instances refer. To test for NULL use is.null. You cannot set attributes on NULL.

So by definition NULL is very different to zero length vectors. A zero length vector very much isn't absent. NULL is really a catch-all for something that is absent or not set, but not missing-ness, which is the job of NA. There is an exception, the zero-length pairlist, as mentioned by @Owen. The Language Definition states:

A zero-length pairlist is NULL, as would be expected in Lisp but in contrast to a zero-length list.

which highlights the exception in this case.

To test for a zero-length vector use something like if(length(foo) == 0L) for example. And combine that with a class check (is.character(foo)) if you want a specific type of zero length vector.

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Though see stackoverflow.com/questions/7170264/… for a peculiar similarity. –  Owen Aug 25 '11 at 18:38
    
Good point and great Answer. –  Gavin Simpson Aug 25 '11 at 18:48
    
@Owen You're correct. I was overlooking that pairlists are not vectors at all, even when they have nonzero length. I've removed my comment to avoid any additional confusion. –  goodside Aug 25 '11 at 18:59
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Here's a partial answer, beginning by simply quoting the R Language Definition Guide:

There is a special object called NULL. It is used whenever there is a need to indicate or specify that an object is absent. It should not be confused with a vector or list of zero length. The NULL object has no type and no modifiable properties. There is only one NULL object in R, to which all instances refer. To test for NULL use is.null. You cannot set attributes on NULL.

I take that to mean that zero length vectors can have attributes, whereas NULL cannot:

> x <- character(0)
> y <- NULL
> attr(x,"name") <- "nm"
> attr(y,"name") <- "nm"
Error in attr(y, "name") <- "nm" : attempt to set an attribute on NULL
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The other guys have the right answers, but I want to add a few curiosities.

First, it's not quite true that NULL "is used whenever there is a need to indicate or specify that an object is absent" as it says in the doc. There are actually 2 other "no data" values in R (not counting NA, which is not a complete value).

There's "missing", which is used for missing arguments:

alist(x=)$x

> identical(NULL, alist(x=)$x)
[1] FALSE
> y = alist(x=)$x
> y
Error: argument "y" is missing, with no default

Then there's "unbound", which you can't (AFAIK) access directly, but using C:

SEXP getUnbound(void) {
    return R_UnboundValue;
}

> x = .Call("getUnbound")
> x
Error: object 'x' not found
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+1 Perhaps what they mean is that NULL "is used by the end user to indicate or specify that an object is abset", while R uses other things internally in some cases. –  joran Aug 25 '11 at 19:10
    
@joran Yes, that's probably a good way of saying it. –  Owen Aug 25 '11 at 19:12
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