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I have a few lines

strcat(myTxt,"data");
strcat(myTxt,"\n");
strcat(myTxt,"data1");

in between the lines ive done strcat of "\n" however when i do a write to a text file the "\n" are ignored and all string are concatenated as datadata1. How can i work around this issue ?!?

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1  
How are you determining that the newline isn't there? Printing it out? Looking at it in the debugger? –  Marvo Aug 25 '11 at 18:53
    
why aren't you using fprintf? –  user195488 Aug 25 '11 at 18:54
    
Can you show us a small complete program that illustrates the problem? The code you've shown us looks ok; the problem is probably in the code you haven't shown us. –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '11 at 18:55
3  
If efficieny matters for you, I highly recommend you to read article Schlemiel the Painter's algorithm –  emre nevayeshirazi Aug 25 '11 at 19:02
    
Make sure you end the last line with a newline too. You're writing a text file and need to make sure each line has an ending. (If you don't, you are venturing out of standard behaviour into either implementation defined or undefined behaviour.) –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 25 '11 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote -2 down vote accepted

For file output, you should do strcat of "\r\n"

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3  
No. For a text stream, the '\n' character is automatically translated to the system's end-of-line representation. –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '11 at 18:55
    
@Keith: All I know is that there have been plenty of times when I've tried using '\n' and it hasn't worked until I added '\r' –  Daniel Aug 25 '11 at 18:57
1  
@Daniel: fopen() takes two arguments. What did you pass as the second argument? (If you called it with one argument and the compiler didn't complain, it's probably because you forgot the required #include <stdio.h>.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '11 at 19:46
2  
@Daniel: This: FILE *f = fopen("test.txt", "w"); fprintf(f, "hello\nworld\n"); fclose(f); should definitely print 2 valid lines of text to test.txt (unless one of the calls fails). Note that I've added a \n at the very end. If that doesn't work for you, then something weird is going on. –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '11 at 20:29
1  
@Daniel: Then something is wrong with your environment. (Possibly the same thing is wrong with the OP's environment as well.) I don't know what it might be. I just tried it in VS2010, and it worked; the lines in test.txt were properly terminated with Windows-style CR-LF pairs. I encourage you to post a new question; perhaps someone can figure out what the problem is. –  Keith Thompson Aug 25 '11 at 20:44

This code works for me:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    char myTxt[100];

    myTxt[0] = 0;
    strcat(myTxt, "data");
    strcat(myTxt, "\n");
    strcat(myTxt, "data1");

    printf("%s\n", myTxt);
    return 0;
}

Did you initialize the buffer's first byte? Edit: works also with a file as output:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    char myTxt[100];
    FILE *out = fopen("out.txt", "wt");

    myTxt[0] = 0;
    strcat(myTxt, "data");
    strcat(myTxt, "\n");
    strcat(myTxt, "data1");

    fprintf(out, "%s\n", myTxt);
    fclose(out);
    return 0;
}
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+1 For initializing the first byte; although that wouldn't explain newline characters being parsed out of the string. –  Daniel Aug 25 '11 at 18:59
    
@Daniel, I agree: it's not an explanation. –  Dacav Aug 25 '11 at 19:01

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