Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some methods like the following:

static public int GetInt(int _default = 0)
{
    // do work, return _default if error
}

static public int? GetInt(int? _default = null)
{
    // do work, return _default if error
}

I was hoping when using these methods as overrides that the method would be chosen also based on the variable I am using them to assign to:

int value1 = GetInt();
int? value2 = GetInt();

However this results in an "Ambiguous Invocation" error.

What can I do to avoid this?

share|improve this question
4  
The return type is never used in overload resolution. –  Gabe Aug 25 '11 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that the return type is not part the signature of a method in C#. So you have to name the methods differently. Also, don't use underscore in parameter names.

To quote MSDN on how method signatures work:

The signature of a method consists of the name of the method and the type and kind (value, reference, or output) of each of its formal parameters, considered in the order left to right. The signature of a method specifically does not include the return type, nor does it include the params modifier that may be specified for the right-most parameter.

This is a way to resolve it. As you return the default of the type, you can just make it generic and use default(T).

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int value1 = GetInt<int>();
        int? value2 = GetInt<int?>();
    }


    static public T GetInt<T>(T defaultValue = default(T))
    {
        bool error = true;
        if (error)
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }
        else
        {
            //yadayada
            return something else;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This does not allow for the specification of the default value (_default in the question) –  Ryan Emerle Aug 25 '11 at 19:05
    
@Ryan well he did not specify that he wanted something other the default "default value", and I don't think he does –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 25 '11 at 19:14
    
@Oskar The parameter is to allow the specification of other values as desired for defaults. For example, in some cases -1 is the desired default for int but it depends on the variable being populated. –  JYelton Aug 25 '11 at 19:21
    
@JYelton kk, question updated –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 25 '11 at 19:26

Switch architecture.

 static public T GetInt<T>(T defaultValue = default(T))
    where T: struct
 {
     // Do Work.

     // On failure
     return defaultValue; 
 }

Then, when you call the function, you should benefit from the generic type:

 int value1 = GetInt(0);
 int? value2 = GetInt(default(int?));

Or if you want to omit the default value:

 int value1 = GetInt<int>();
 int? value2 = GetInt<int?>();

Alternatively, if you just want the default value, you can simply return

 return default(T);

UPDATE: Added constraint - obviously, the problem with making it generic is then you can supply any type; however, your problem then becomes making it compliant to turn an integer into T.

share|improve this answer
    
The new method wouldn't be required if you're specifying the arguments.. It's the optional parameter part of the question. –  Ryan Emerle Aug 25 '11 at 19:00
    
I'll update with the solution to that then. –  Tejs Aug 25 '11 at 19:01
    
-1 doesn't compile. Why use where T: struct? Structs are non nullable, so int? is not valid –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 25 '11 at 19:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.