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How can I get an instance of a static class with a string?

Example:

class Apple : IFruit
{
    public static Apple GetInstance() { ... }
    private Apple() { }

    // other stuff
}

class Banana : IFruit
{
    public static Banana GetInstance() { ... }
    private Banana() { }

    // other stuff
}

// Elsewhere in the code...
string fruitIWant = "Apple";
IFruit myFruitInstance = [What goes here using "fruitIWant"?].GetInstance();
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1  
C#, presumably? If so, please tag your question as such... –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 25 '11 at 19:47
    
It doesn't have to be C#, the example was just that - an example. The solution should work for both C# and VB.NET. –  SpikeX Aug 25 '11 at 19:49
2  
@SpikeX I don't see any static class in code provided. What you're asking for? Please correct question. –  Tigran Aug 25 '11 at 19:50
    
The class is not static but the method I want is. The question is worded as such because I don't want an answer that gives me an instance of the class, I want the class reference itself. Any time you have static members in a class, a static instance of that class is available for access. –  SpikeX Aug 25 '11 at 19:52
    
Btw why don't you just invoke the constructor instead of using a static GetINstance methnod? –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 25 '11 at 20:16
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
Type appleType = Type.GetType("Apple");
MethodInfo methodInfo = appleType.GetMethod(
                            "GetInstance",
                            BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static
                        );
object appleInstance = methodInfo.Invoke(null, null);

Note that in Type.GetType you need to use the assembly-qualified name.

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This worked best. It turns out that "GetInstance" was actually a property, not a method in my specific application, but the question and answer still match up and this was the solution that worked best for me, so you win. Thanks! :) –  SpikeX Aug 25 '11 at 20:38
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Here is a complete example. Just pass in the name of the type you want to load and the name of the method to invoke:

namespace Test
{

    class Program
    {
        const string format = @"hh\:mm\:ss\,fff";
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Invoke("Test.Apple", "GetInstance"));
            Console.WriteLine(Invoke("Test.Banana", "GetInstance"));
        }
        public static object Invoke(string type, string method)
        {
            Type t = Type.GetType(type);
            object o = t.InvokeMember(method, BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, t, new object[0]);
            return o;
        }

        }
        class Apple 
        {
            public static Apple GetInstance() { return new Apple(); }
            private Apple() { }

            // other stuff
        }

        class Banana
        {
            public static Banana GetInstance() { return new Banana(); }
            private Banana() { }

            // other stuff
        }

}
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You do like this:

string fruitIWant = "ApplicationName.Apple";

IFruit a = Type.GetType(fruitIWant).GetMethod("GetInstance").Invoke(null, null) as IFruit;

For ApplicationName you substitute the namespace where the class is declared.

(Tested and working.)

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OK, may be I got your question. A pseudocode

EDIT

foreach (var type in System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes())
{
      if (type.Name.Equals("MyClass"))
      {
          MethodInfo mi = type.GetMethod("GetInstance", BindingFlags.Static);
          object o = mi.Invoke(t, null);
          break;
      }
}

Should work..

share|improve this answer
    
You used typeof(Apple) but I need this to be figured out using a string. You can never type Apple by itself, you need to use the string variable. Additionally, this can be condensed into one line - no need to declare an additional MethodInfo that you'll never use. –  SpikeX Aug 25 '11 at 19:55
    
@SpikeX, see my edited post, something like this ? –  Tigran Aug 25 '11 at 20:02
    
What if it's not in the executing assembly? Why are you doing a linear search through the types? Your code for dynamically invoking a static method is not correct. –  Jason Aug 25 '11 at 20:05
    
@Jason: it's reported like pseudocde, I didn't even compile just write inside the site editor. Just to give an idea. Is this is a problem? –  Tigran Aug 25 '11 at 20:11
    
The problem isn't that you wrote it directly in the site, it's that your methodology is wrong. Why execute a loop when there are other, more efficient functions that do exactly the same thing? –  SpikeX Aug 26 '11 at 13:47
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While the others give you what you asked for, this is probably what you want:

IFriut GetFruit(string fruitName)
{
   switch(fruitName)
   {
       case "Apple":
          return Apple.GetInstance();
       case "Banana":
          return Banana.GetInstance();
       default:
          throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This relies on the fact that I'd have to input entries manually each time I added a new class based on IFruit, which I don't want to do (and which defeats the purpose of having an interface in the first place), especially if I'm dynamically loading assemblies. This code's maintainability is very poor. –  SpikeX Aug 26 '11 at 13:49
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