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I wrote the following extension method that looks for a consecutive sequence of items that satisfy the predicate passed to it. The number of consecutive items in the sequence is determined by the parameter 'sequenceSize.

As an example, I might have an IEnumerable of integers and I want to find 10 consecutive values that are greater than 100. This extension method will determine if such a sequence exists.

This method works well. But, because of what it must do, it can be slow if there are a sizable number of elements in the IEnumerable because it has to start with the first element, look for consecutive values satisfying the predicate, then go to the second element and do the same etc.

I'm looking for suggestions on how to speed this up. I tried using AsParallel() but that had no impact.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> FindSequenceConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, 
                                                                     Predicate<T> predicate, 
                                                                     int sequenceSize)
{
    IEnumerable<T> current = sequence;

    while (current.Count() > sequenceSize)
    {
        IEnumerable<T> window = current.Take(sequenceSize);

        if (window.Where(x => predicate(x)).Count() >= sequenceSize)
            yield return window;

        current = current.Skip(1);
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe this solution will provide the best performance and will scale better as the sequences get larger because it doesn't allocate any additional buffers (Lists or Queues), nor does it have to convert the result to a List or do any counts on the result buffer. Plus, it only iterates over the sequence once.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> FindSequenceConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence,
    Predicate<T> predicate, int sequenceSize)
{
    IEnumerable<T> window = Enumerable.Repeat(default(T), 0);

    int count = 0;

    foreach (var item in sequence)
    {
        if (predicate(item))
        {
            window = window.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(item, 1));
            count++;

            if (count == sequenceSize)
            {
                yield return window;
                window = window.Skip(1);
                count--;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            count = 0;
            window = Enumerable.Repeat(default(T), 0);
        }                
    }
}
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1  
It's a good effort, but this misses sequences. If you have 5 consecutive items passing the predicate ([a, b, c, d, e]) and are looking for sequences of 3, you'll get [a, b, c], but not [b, c, d] and [c, d, e]. Secondly, I'm not sure about the claim of scalability, but I can't be too critical, as I am by no means an expert. But methods like Enumerable.Repeat will also create garbage, classes are created and populated. Linq is not a free ride. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 26 '11 at 14:31
    
@Anthony You posted my comment! I actually upvoted your answer, and I'm pretty sure it's the best option. –  dlev Aug 26 '11 at 14:45
1  
@Anthony Shoot, you're right. Need to add a Skip() or something as well. Bleh. Will just roll back and Jim can handle it. :) –  dlev Aug 26 '11 at 14:54
1  
@Anthony -Fixed the bug and now it essentially identical to your solution but more verbose :-(, yours is more elegant. I perf tested both and they are effectively identical even at very large sequences with your solution winning out by 1ms with over 26K elements in the original sequence! So I guess it would come down to preference in how the results are rendered. In your solution, the "windows" are already realized in the returned sequences, in mine, they are not yet rendered until someone iterates over them. Determining which is a better approach is really beyond my time now :-) Both are good –  Jim Aug 26 '11 at 15:27
1  
@Jim - Both are very good. However, I actually prefer not having the sequence(s) realized until iterated over because there are many cases where I don't care what's in the sequence, I just need to know if the sequence exists. –  Randy Minder Aug 26 '11 at 15:44

The most likely reason for the slowness of this method is the repeated invocation of .Count(), which will immediately enumerate the sequence to determine the number of elements.

You're likely better off explicitly testing the criteria and keeping track of counts, rather than using Where() and Count() repeatedly.

In general, this method is enumerating the sequence a lot. You might experience a good speed-up if you call .ToList() to enumerate the sequence once, and then perform your operations on the generated list. (Note that this won't work if you expect to use this method on infinite-length sequences.)

Update: You are testing for >= sequenceSize, even though window.Count() == sequenceSize. In other words, you just need All():

if (window.All(x => predicate(x)))
    yield return window;

Not sure how much that will help, but it's semantically clearer at least.

Further Edit: Consider this method:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> FindSequenceConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Predicate<T> predicate, int sequenceSize)
{
    List<T> list = sequence.ToList();
    List<bool> matchList = list.Select(x => predicate(x)).ToList();

    int start = 0;
    int count = list.Count;

    while (start + sequenceSize <= count)
    {
        var range = matchList.GetRange(start, sequenceSize);
        if (range.All(x => x))
            yield return list.GetRange(start, sequenceSize);

        start++;
    }
}

It evaluates the sequence once, and then partitions a list of necessary.

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+1. Whether All will have a measurable impact, I can't say, but it does at least mean you don't hit every element in the sequence. Could be a big plus if you have a long string of elements that don't meet the filter predicate. –  Paul Phillips Aug 25 '11 at 20:09
    
@dlev - I don't see how your solution works. I'm looking for consecutive values. Your 'matchList' implementation seems to make it impossible to find consecutive values. –  Randy Minder Aug 25 '11 at 21:00
    
It definitely works; I've tested it :) The matchList is essentially a cache of the results of calling the predicate on each member of the sequence. matchList[i] == predicate(list[i]) –  dlev Aug 25 '11 at 21:04
    
@dlev - Indeed it does work, and very fast. Nice work! Thank you. –  Randy Minder Aug 25 '11 at 21:53

I'm thinking something like this might work for you, as you can walk over the list once and basically maintain a queue of consecutive items passing the predicate, clearing (all) and dequeueing (one) as necessary.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> FindSequenceConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Predicate<T> predicate, int sequenceSize)
{
    var queue = new Queue<T>();

    foreach (T item in sequence)
    {
        if (predicate(item))
        {
            queue.Enqueue(item);
            if (queue.Count == sequenceSize)
            {
                yield return queue.ToList();
                queue.Dequeue();
            }
        }
        else
        {
            queue.Clear();
        }
    }
}

So writing

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 2, 8, 3, 5, 6 };
foreach (var seq in array.FindSequenceConsecutive(i => i > 2, 3))
{
    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", seq));
}

Yields

3,4,5
8,3,5
3,5,6
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