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Say I have a unidirectional @ManyToOne relationship like the following:

@Entity
public class Parent implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private long id;
}

@Entity
public class Child implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn
    private Parent parent;  
}

If I have a parent P and children C1...Cn referencing back to P, is there a clean and pretty way in JPA to automatically remove the children C1...Cn when P is removed (i.e. entityManager.remove(P))?

What I'm looking for is a functionality similar to ON DELETE CASCADE in SQL.

This is essentially the same question as this one (link), and from what I can gather from that, the answer is "no"?

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1  
Even if only 'Child' has a reference to 'Parent' (in that way the referencing is unidirectional) is it problematic for you to add the List of 'Child' with a '@OneToMany' mapping and 'Cascade=ALL' attribute to the 'Parent'? I assume that JPA should resolve that even tough only 1 side holds the reference. –  kvDennis Aug 25 '11 at 21:32
1  
@kvDennis, there are cases where you don't want to tightly couple the many-side to the one side. E.g. in ACL-like setups where security permissions are transparent "add-on" –  Bachi Nov 13 '13 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Relationships in JPA are always unidirectional, unless you associate the parent with the child in both directions. Cascading REMOVE operations from the parent to the child will require a relation from the parent to the child (not just the opposite).

You'll therefore need to do this:

  • Either, change the unidirectional @ManyToOne relationship to a bi-directional @ManyToOne, or a unidirectional @OneToMany. You can then cascade REMOVE operations so that EntityManager.remove will remove the parent and the children. You can also specify orphanRemoval as true, to delete any orphaned children when the child entity in the parent collection is set to null, i.e. remove the child when it is not present in any parent's collection.
  • Or, specify the foreign key constraint in the child table as ON DELETE CASCADE. You'll need to invoke EntityManager.clear() after calling EntityManager.remove(parent) as the persistence context needs to be refreshed - the child entities are not supposed to exist in the persistence context after they've been deleted in the database.
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No1 worked for me perfectly. Thanks! –  ŁukaszBachman Jan 8 '13 at 19:36
    
No2 worked perfectly, too ;-) –  omilke Feb 13 at 9:57
    
is there a way to do No2 with a JPA annotation? –  user2573153 Feb 13 at 23:26
    
How do I do No2 with Hibernate xml mappings? –  arg20 Mar 15 at 5:01

Create a bi-directional relationship, like this:

@Entity
public class Parent implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "parent", cascade = CascadeType.REMOVE)
    private Set<Child> children;
}
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