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I have the following code. I want to make a check box that will activate this code when checked and deactivates the code when unchecked. can someone show me how?

<script type="text/javascript">
var auto_refresh = setInterval(
function ()
{
$('#load_tweets').load('record_count.php').fadeIn("slow");
}, 10000); // refresh every 10000 milliseconds

<body>
<div id="load_tweets"> </div>
</body>

</script>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var refresh = function() { $('#load_tweets').load('record_count.php').fadeIn("slow"); };
refresh();

var auto_refresh = null;
$('#the-checkbox').change(function(ev) {
    if (auto_refresh) clearInterval(auto_refresh);
    auto_refresh = $(this).is(':checked') ? setInterval(refresh, 10000) : null;
});
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Use click(), not change(), because the former always happens instantly, the latter only when the control loses focus. –  Tomalak Aug 25 '11 at 21:43
    
@Tomalak, not true for checkboxes, according to the jquery docs: "For select boxes, checkboxes, and radio buttons, the event is fired immediately when the user makes a selection with the mouse, but for the other element types the event is deferred until the element loses focus." –  Ben Lee Aug 25 '11 at 21:46
    
@Ben Lee i got an error on this line if ($(this).is(':checked') { –  sarsar Aug 25 '11 at 21:47
    
@sarsar, oops, forgot a closing parens. Fixed. –  Ben Lee Aug 25 '11 at 21:48
    
@Ben Hmm maybe I got that mixed up. I just always use click() for these things, but I'll try to keep that in mind. :) –  Tomalak Aug 25 '11 at 21:51
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setInterval(function () {
  if ( $("#myCheckbox").is(":checked") ) {
    $('#load_tweets').load('record_count.php').fadeIn("slow");
  }
}, 10000); // refresh every 10000 milliseconds
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This is an elegant solution if it covers the use case (and there's a good chance it does), but the timing will be a little different than what the OP literally asked for since the interval is always running. There is no starting/stopping it. –  Ben Lee Aug 25 '11 at 21:38
    
@Ben I thought about mentioning this, but then I figured that a 10 second refresh interval would indicate that timing is not a primary concern here. Then again, psychological effects are strong with stuff like this. –  Tomalak Aug 25 '11 at 21:41
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