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I guess i have a rather simple question since I'm new to Ruby and even newer to ActiveRecords.

What I want to achieve is a class representation with ActiveRecords (and the corresponding SQL schema) that models the following problem:

  • There exist categories and subcategories (modeled by parent_id)
  • Products belong to only one category
  • Each product can have 0..inf features
  • Features simply have some data fields and are only referenced by the products

My current schema is shown below in the picture: My database schema for representing products belonging to sub(categories). Each product has a certain number of Features.

Is this schema suitable for ActiveRecords? How would the classes look like? I simply cant figure out how the JoinTable fits into the ActiveRecord structure.

Further, how can i model the link from parent_id->categories.id?

Any help appreciated!

cheers

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To model the relationships you described you would do:

models/category.rb
class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :products
    has_many :subcategories, :class_name => "Category", :foreign_key => :parent_id
end

models/product.rb
class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :product
    has_many :features, :through => :product_features
    has_many :product_features
end

models/feature.rb
class Feature < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :product_features
  has_many :products, :through => :product_features
end

models/productfeature.rb
class ProductFeature < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :feature
end

Given this structure then you have the join modelled as a Many-to-Many relation. This is useful since the HABTM style of join is going away in Rails 3.1

To get the information, I often use the console rails console for testing and this would allow you do do

@category = Category.first   #get the first category
@category.subcategories      #returns an array of categories

The traversal of the links is via the relations that you setup in the models, with the intention that its readable, in the context of using sensible names. The self-joins, as per your question, is also covered in Rails Guides: Associations with a good example. The rest of this guide also details the other relationships.

One other thing to remember is to create your migrations so that the join table is created with the id's which are the foreign keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, great answer. Upvoted already. – pokey909 Aug 26 '11 at 10:12
    
Due to most complete answer I selected yours as the best one. It got me on the right track and I think i got a hang of it now. Category was still missing a belongs_to :parant_category, :class_name => "Category" to allow up and down traversal. But besides that, everything seems to be correct. Thanks again! – pokey909 Aug 26 '11 at 17:07

My models would look like this:

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :products
end

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :category
  has_many   :product_features
  has_many   :features, :through => :product_features
end

class ProductFeature  < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :feature
end

class Feature < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many   :product_features
  has_many   :products, :through => :product_features
end

Rails has an association called has_and_belongs_to_many. Rails expects a table with two columns to store the join data. I usually use dual has_many to achieve the same results as it gives you flexibility to add additional information in the join table.

Sample code

product.category
product.category = category1


category.products
category.products << product1


product.features
product.features << feature1

feature.products
feature.products << product1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the extensive information. That is exactly what I was looking for. I'm going to accept an answer soon when i read your and Grant's excellent answers thoroughly. – pokey909 Aug 26 '11 at 10:12

Here is the API for ActiveRecord::Associations::ClassMethods

There are a lot of examples in there of different relationships and how to construct them. It's worth taking the time to understand how/why you construct these associations.

For the Many-to-many join you will want to look at

  • has_many ..., :through => ...
  • has_and_belongs_to_many ...

The docs explain when and why to use each.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, now your answer contains actual information :-) As far as i see it now, that means i dont have to model the join table at all. But how does the mapper know the name of my join table? can i specify it somehow? – pokey909 Aug 25 '11 at 23:16
    
If you read the API docs there is a lot of inferring of names going on (remember rails is convention over configuration). Thats why this kind of work can trip you up when you start - I've recently been struggling with self referential many to many joins – Paul.s Aug 25 '11 at 23:20

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