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Title should be clear, I'm having trouble accessing the lowest level properties with multiple inheritance.

Object A extends Object B Object B extends Object C

Object C has a property that I want to access from object A, but I can only acces it from object B for some reason. Goes for both variables and functions.

I'm using a custom libbrary - "Windows Game Library(4.0)" to be exact. I never had any problems with this when not-using a library. The only difference with now and then were that I'm using the "public" keyword on classes in the library now, because I would get an "inaccessable" error otherwise.

In code:

Object A

    namespace ExampleGame
{
    class Player : Actor
    {

    public Player()
    {
        //most things happen in gameobject<actor<this
        MaxSpeed = new Vector2(10, 10);
        Acceleration = new Vector2(5, 5);
        Velocity = new Vector2(0, 0);
        MaxJumpPower = 15;
    }


    override public void Update()
    {
        base.Update();

        manageInput();
    }

}
}

Object B

namespace GridEngineLibrary.objects
{
 public class Actor : GameObject
    {
    public int MaxJumpPower;

    public Actor()
    {
        canMove = true;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// moves the object but it's acceleration
    /// </summary>

    public void jump()
    {

        if (grounded == true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("jump!");
            Direction.Y = -1;
            Velocity.Y = MaxJumpPower * -1;
        }
    }

}
}

Object C

    namespace GridEngineLibrary.objects
{
    public class GameObject
    {
        public Vector2 location;
        public SpriteBatch spritebatch;
        public Vector2 hitArea;
        public AnimatedTexture graphic;

    public Vector2 Velocity;
    public Vector2 Acceleration;
    public Vector2 MaxSpeed;
    public Vector2 Direction;
    public int Z = 1;

    public bool canMove;

    public GameObject()
    {
        spritebatch = SpriteManager.spriteBatch;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// set the animated texture 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="location"></param>
    /// <param name="size"></param>
    /// <param name="TextureName">name of texture to load</param>
    public void setAnimatedTexture(Vector2 location, Vector2 size, string TextureName, 
                                    int totalFrames, int totalStates, int animationSpeed = 8, 
                                    int spacing = 9)
    {
        graphic = new AnimatedTexture(location, size, TextureName);
        graphic.isAnimated = true;
        graphic.totalStates = totalStates;
        graphic.totalFrames = totalFrames;
        graphic.animationSpeed = animationSpeed;
        graphic.spacing = spacing;

        hitArea = size;
    }


    virtual public void Update()
    {
        graphic.update(location);
    }
}

}
share|improve this question
    
I just put your classes into LINQPad and I was able to access members of GameObject from Player provided they had at least protected access. That's what I would expect would happen. It doesn't make sense that you can access GameObject members from Actor, but not from Player. I think you must have a build issue with your classes residing in different projects, but without replicating the error I'm just guessing. –  Enigmativity Aug 26 '11 at 4:05
    
Where is grounded defined? If it's supposed to be in the GameObject class, and the code you have compiles, I would suggest that you're inheriting from a different GameObject class somehow. It's probable that you just missed something in your sample code here, but figured I'd bring it up. –  Dave Carlile Aug 26 '11 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

This is by no means an expert answer, but you could always just expose the properties you want from Class C in Class B and thereby access them from base in class A.

I'm sure there is a more elegant solution, but just sort of mirroring (or perhaps it would be called tunneling?) the properties through B should at least be serviceable.

share|improve this answer
    
This is indeed possible, but makes everything such a mess :( –  omgnoseat Aug 26 '11 at 14:53

There might be an Actor class in the ExampleGame namespace or some namespace imported by a using directive that Player is inheriting from. This would not be the same Actor class as is in the GridEngine.objects namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no Actor class in the ExampleGame, the ExampleGame just has the "Game" class (application access point) and the Player class. –  omgnoseat Aug 26 '11 at 14:53

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